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Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club Inc was established as a Florida Not For Profit organization on March 17, 2013...Bobby Jones' Birthday!

Our Mission is to enhance the experience at BOBBY JONES GOLF CLUB for City of Sarasota and area residents and visitors and to help effect, through sponsorship of projects, programs and events, the Four Initiatives.

The Bobby Jones Initiative, The Donald Ross Initiative, The Paul Azinger Initiative and The John Hamilton Gillespie Initiative.

In the News 1909-Now

Sarasota Herald, June 6, 1926. Image Courtesy of Sarasota County Historical Resources.

Bobby Jones Golf Club News Archives

Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club looks into the archives of newspapers and newsmakers, with selected articles that bring history alive


BOBBY JONES PLAN APPROVED

SARASOTA ENDORSES NEW BOBBY JONES GOLF PLAN

tuesDAY, octoBER 3, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY ZACK MURDOCK, STAFF WRITER

ZACH.MURDOCK@HERALDTRIBUNE.COM

CITY COMMISSION EMBRACES $21.6M OVERHAUL,                                          HINTING THAT COST MAY DROP

CITY LEADERS ARE LIKELY TO PURSUE ONLY PIECES OF A $21.6 MILLION PLAN.

SARASOTA - City leaders endorsed a plan for a $21.6 million overhaul of the municipal Bobby Jones Golf Club on Monday night, despite balking at the price tag.

Instead, city commissioners hinted they do not intend to spend anywhere near the entire cost of the whole project, likely favoring a plan that combines individual elements that could be eligible for grant funding into a smaller-scale upgrade for the facility.

That is essentially how golf architect and city consultant Richard Mandell designed his new master plan to revamp the historic municipal golf course originally conceived by legendary course designer Donald Ross in the 1920s.

The $21.6 million iteration includes every upgrade that every stakeholder wanted, including renovating both 18-hole courses, a new clubhouse and driving range, extensive stormwater upgrades and constructing a new player development center with an innovative “adjustable” nine-hole course at the site.

Mandell has broken it down further to provide costs for each of those elements, suggesting the city could mix and match its priorities depending on how much it wants to spend and pointing to potential grants that could help defray those costs.

We all know in life we don’t get everything we want,” Mandell told the City Commission. “So I went back and created a less involved alternative, something that would get the job done.”

For example, Mandell’s plan includes extensive stormwater improvements for the site that is a critical piece of the Phillippi Creek watershed that helps control water quality and flooding in that area of the city and county.

It could pursue those projects and upgrade tee boxes for about $9 million and likely would be eligible for several grants, including a match of up to half from the Southwest Florida Water Management District, according to the plan.

Those grant opportunities particularly interested Mayor Shelli Freeland Eddie, who asked the city to accept the plan and have staff begin to pull it apart to identify what pieces could be reasonable based on available city and grant funding opportunities. After staff identifies those possibilities, she has directed the city to host workshops to present several reasonable options the commission could begin to fund and construct over the coming years.

The workshops will give golfers an “opportunity to tell us what they want, whether it’s all, nothing or some combination of the options” and the commission can make final funding decisions from there, she said.

More than a dozen avid golfers, some of whom served on the original study committee that led to the new master plan, spoke in support of the improvements. But some have suggested Mandell’s plan strays too far from the original Ross designs, which some hoped to restore exactly and fear anything otherwise could jeopardize grant funding.

Only Commissioner Hagen Brody voted against the plan, extending his ongoing criticism that the commission is not being conservative enough financially. He echoed the frequently heralded numbers that “golf is dying” as courses close and fewer players hit the links.

This year, for the first time, the club sought and received a $425,000 subsidy from the city’s general fund to prop up its $2.8 million budget amid declining revenues.

Brody suggested crafting several options that actually scale back the golf club, potentially dropping one or more of the courses or facilities entirely in an effort to save money. None of the other commissioners supported and neither do the groups that helped develop the master plan, which did at least briefly consider that option.

We have to be realistic here. The facts are that golf is in decline,” Brody said. “We’re not trying to save golf and I don’t see us creating a world-renowned destination. We’re trying to provide a public course at an affordable price that’s a quality course people can enjoy playing on.”

Mandell disagreed. He has argued that as long as the city wants Bobby Jones to remain a golf facility, it will have to pony up for at least some upgrades, which will be expensive no matter how minimal.

There is a core of golfers and there are a bunch of them right behind me,” he said. “The game of golf is strong, but once golf decided to become an industry ... people started losing money. It’s not a dying sport at all; it’s a bubble.”

Golf architect Richard Mandell said most of the infrastructure at Bobby Jones's long outlived its recommended lifespan. Photograph courtesy of The Sarasota Observer.

Golf architect Richard Mandell said most of the infrastructure at Bobby Jones's long outlived its recommended lifespan.

Photograph courtesy of The Sarasota Observer.

BOBBY JONES IMPROVEMENT NEEDS TOP $20 MILLION

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

A consultant says Bobby Jones Golf Club is in need of major renovations — and that there’s no guarantee the course will ever turn a profit.

BY DAVID CONWAY, DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

Throughout his 169-page business plan recommending renovations for Bobby Jones Golf Club, golf architect Richard Mandell repeatedly states the 45-hole, city-owned facility has fallen into disrepair.

Nearly all of the course features have outlived their recommended lifespans. The lack of infrastructure investments has diminished the reputation of Bobby Jones.

“Public perception of Bobby Jones Golf Club … is of an old and tired, rundown (municipal course) with terrible conditions compared to surrounding semi-private courses,” Mandell wrote.

Mandell, hired in January to develop a master plan for improvements at Bobby Jones, presented his finished report to the Parks, Recreation and Environmental Protection board Sept. 19. In addition to detailing hole redesigns and drainage upgrades, Mandell also provided an estimate for the work needed to restore Bobby Jones to a high-quality public course.

Major Recommendations

In his plan for renovating Bobby Jones Golf Club, Richard Mandell attempts to maintain the elements of the course players like while emphasizing the history of the facility and improving the infrastructure.

Mandell’s recommendations include:

  • Transforming the Gillespie Course into a player development center

  • Removing the “American Course” and “British Course” designations, creating four nine-hole groupings that can be configured into two different 18-hole courses

  • Redesigning the 18 Donald Ross-designed holes to capture the spirit of the original layout

  • Building a new two-story clubhouse

  • Replacing the irrigation system

  • Expanding the drainage system

  • Re-grassing the entire course

The full report is available on the city website.

The total price for a comprehensive renovation of Bobby Jones is $21.6 million, Mandell estimates. Recognizing the significance of that expense, he also shared a “less-involved” plan — with a price tag of $18.7 million.

The city commissioned Mandell’s report because of declining revenues and activity at Bobby Jones. In the budget for 2017-18, the municipal course will receive a $425,000 subsidy from the city’s general fund. Bobby Jones is supposed to be a self-sustaining operation, but after six consecutive years of losses, the facility’s reserve fund has run dry.

Mandell said most of the investments he recommended are the only way that Bobby Jones could become a successful long-term golf operation. But, questioned by members of the parks board, he said there would still uncertainty about the course’s profitability.

If the city of Sarasota wants Bobby Jones to stay as Bobby Jones, they have to rebuild these features,” Mandell said. “Will it be self-sufficient? I can’t answer that.”

Hitting the green

That uncertainty didn’t sit well with John Tuccillo, a member of the parks board.

He was complimentary of Mandell’s work, but felt the city wasn’t in a good position to make a decision about the future of Bobby Jones without an equally thorough analysis of the business operations after any upgrades were implemented.

We are operating here under the ‘Field of Dreams’ assumption — if you build it, they will come,” Tuccillo said. “Golf is a dying sport; golf courses are a dying business. There really isn’t any kind of guarantee that the financial performance of Bobby Jones Golf Course is going to be improved even by implementing your full plan.”

Mandell said some expenses could be offset with grant funding. Still, Tuccillo feared the prospect of the city investing upward of $10 million only for the course to keep losing money.

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Mandell has objected to the characterization of golf as a dying sport. Instead, he says golf went through a 30- to 40-year period of bloat, with the bubble bursting recently. As a result, there is more competition among golf operations.

He admits that’s a challenge for Bobby Jones. But he believes the municipal facility has its own advantages. It has history in the community. It bears the name of a legendary golfer, and renowned golf architect Donald Ross designed the course. It’s not surrounded by residential properties, and it’s priced competitively.

And he thinks the city benefits from maintaining 425 acres of open space. The idea of the city cutting ties with the golf operation at Bobby Jones was not part of his analysis.

The City Commission is scheduled to discuss Mandell’s report Monday, Oct. 2. Mandell has itemized his recommended improvements, anticipating some fiscal concerns from officials. He’s also presented a four-year phasing plan for the renovations.

He knows the scope of the upgrades is jarring. But based on the current status of Bobby Jones, he said there’s no reasonable way to keep operating the facility without a major overhaul.

Forget everything this report says — the bottom line is, at some point, these features need to be rebuilt in order to function as a golf course,” Mandell said. “That’s no matter what.

BOBBY JONES RENOVATION TO COST UP TO $21.6 MILLION

A golfer plays on the American course at Bobby Jones Golf Complex. A consultant's plan to improve the 1920s municipal golf course comes with a $21.6 million cost and various suggestions on how to proceed with some of the improvements. Photo Courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

A golfer plays on the American course at Bobby Jones Golf Complex. A consultant's plan to improve the 1920s municipal golf course comes with a $21.6 million cost and various suggestions on how to proceed with some of the improvements. Photo Courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY ZACK BURDOCK, STAFF WRITER

CITY CONSULTANT SUGGESTS DIVVYING UP IMPROVEMENTS INTO SERIES OF MINI-PROJECTS

ZACH.MURDOCK@HERALDTRIBUNE.CoM

SARASOTA - A completely renovated and improved Bobby Jones Golf Club could cost the city of Sarasota more than $21.6 million, according to the final master plan finished this month.

The long-awaited plan has been in the works since the beginning of the year and represents a best-case proposal to revamp the historic municipal golf course originally conceived by legendary course designer Donald Ross in the 1920s.

But the price tag for the full project is $7 million more than a study committee estimated the project could cost several years ago and will raise eyebrows at the City Commission, which just concluded a contentious budget process with lingering questions about future obligations.

Members of the city’s parks board, who have helped develop the plan with city consultant and golf course architect Richard Mandell, struggled with the sticker shock, too. They unanimously approved the plan last week and lauded its recommendations, but they conceded it is a steep price with no guarantees.

To help, Mandell has broken the project into a series of mini-projects from which the city can pick and choose its favorites — greens and tees, a practice facility, a clubhouse, drainage and environmental improvements can all be mixed and matched.

Parks board member John Tuccillo praised Mandell’s vision for the course but offered a grim warning.

We are operating here under the ‘Field of Dreams’ assumption: If you build it they will come,” he said. “Golf is a dying sport, golf courses are a dying business and there really isn’t any kind of guarantee that the financial performance of Bobby Jones golf course is going to be improved, even by implementing the full plan. For people who golf, it’ll be delightful. Will it bring more people? I don’t know.

My problem is, are we going to get, with the redesign and with the renovation, sufficient traffic on an operational basis to keep Bobby Jones solvent?

But Mandell challenged that thinking, arguing much of the course and its facilities are long past their expected 30-year lifespan. There is no disagreement that the area should remain a golf club, it’s just a matter of choosing how to invest in it, he said.

If the city of Sarasota wants Bobby Jones to stay as Bobby Jones, they have to rebuild these features,” he said. “Will it be self-sufficient? I can’t answer that. If the city sees this as open space and there are all these environmental benefits and they see it as a recreational opportunity, they’ve got to improve the infrastructure no matter what.

I can’t guarantee you you’re going to make money at it, but if you’re in, you’ve got to be in.”

Course design

At the center of Mandell’s plan for the three-course, 45-hole complex are course renovations, a new clubhouse and the re-imagining of the nine-hole executive course on the west side of Circus Boulevard there. He envisions turning the area into an "adjustable course," driving range and extra practice facilities as a learning center for new or young golfers.

The final recommendation for the two 18-hole courses, the British and the American, is to revamp them as four, nine-hole segments. During part of the year, they could play as the existing British and American courses. But during another part of the year, the city could open the north and west nines as a new 18-hole configuration and the south and east nines as another, essentially turning the complex into four distinct courses.

The entire project also would include extensive improvements to the course’s capacity as a stormwater site.

The proposal includes increasing the important wetland’s floodplain capacity by almost 20 acres with additional canals, pond storage and dry hollow. It also includes planting another 18 acres of native pond buffers to help water runoff and sites for 10 additional wellhead locations to expand the city’s capacity to draw drinking water from underneath the course in an emergency.

We start with one basic estimate, which is what I would call a comprehensive renovation option, for the whole site that satisfies all desires of all stakeholders,” Mandell explained. “So if we took everything that everybody wanted and we did our ‘Bewitched’ little nose thing — all desires of all stakeholders as best we can — here’s what we’re going to do and here’s our cost.”

But Mandell is the first to admit the entire project likely is too expensive to bite off at once, or even at all.

Nearly a quarter of Mandell’s almost 170-page report details more than a dozen funding options, from spreading projects over several years to breaking them into individual pieces the city could choose from and schedule at will.

For example, it would cost about $4.25 million to rebuild bunkers and greens on the British and American courses. It would cost about $9 million to pursue just the drainage improvements and remake the tee boxes, Mandell offered.

As much as $10 million in various local, state and federal grants also could be available for the project, which could help at least partially fund nearly every type of improvement the city might choose, Mandell added.

Golf’s future

Any option the City Commission ultimately might choose for Bobby Jones is likely to come with a cost-benefit analysis of the future of the municipal club.

This year, for the first time, the club sought and received a $425,000 subsidy from the city’s general fund to prop up its $2.8 million budget amid declining revenues. 

The golf course is projecting a $287,000 loss in the coming year. It has turned a profit once since 2009 — of $25,000 in 2011 — in the heart of the economic downturn, according to city documents. From 2007 to 2013, total rounds at the club annually dropped from a high of 143,000 to 102,000, Mandell reported.

It’s all about attracting rounds and getting more rounds,” Mandell said. “That’s the challenge.”

Mandell’s plan does not address how upgrades could affect the courses’ prices — that is a policy decision city leaders would have to weigh against their goals for the club, he said.

When the study committee recommended upgrades for the facility, it estimated a $14.5 million project would require at least a $5 increase to per-round costs to help defray the expense, said parks board member Shawn Pierson, who leads the Friends of the Bobby Jones Golf Club and has passionately worked for years on plans for the course.

Parks board members agreed it will be critical to keep Bobby Jones an affordable golf option, particularly compared to other private courses competing for many of the same players.

That must be part of the discussion with the City Commission about the plan and how or when to implement any of it, Bobby Jones General Manager Sue Martin said. She hopes to bring the plan to the full commission at its Oct. 2 meeting.

A golfer chips onto the green with the clubhouse in the background at Bobby Jones Golf Club. Consultant and golf architect Richard Mandell said much of the municipal course and its facilities are long past their expected 30-year lifespan. Photo Courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

A golfer chips onto the green with the clubhouse in the background at Bobby Jones Golf Club. Consultant and golf architect Richard Mandell said much of the municipal course and its facilities are long past their expected 30-year lifespan. Photo Courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

IRMA'S WINDS 'FIND' DOZENS OF LOST GOLF BALLS AT BOBBY JONES

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

BY ERIC GARWOOD, MANAGING EDITOR

The city of Sarasota announced that the American course at Bobby Jones is expected to open for play Saturday, Sept. 23. The British and Gillespie courses were already open for play.

In golf, the cardinal rule is simple: Play it where it lies.

In the sand, in the mud, in the long grass. Just take your medicine and hit it. And hit it again, if necessary.

Except in the case of a palm tree on the par-5 sixth hole of Bobby Jones Golf Club’s British Course. And a few more similar palms around the course.

When Hurricane Irma struck over the weekend, that particular palm gave up at least a dozen reasons for violating golf’s most basic tenet -- they had been stuck there after errant shots. Plenty of other balls turned up similarly below other palm canopies around the course, as they often do after high winds.

It’s kind of like an Easter egg pick-up out there,’’ said Sue Martin, the golf manager at the city-run course, adding the staff probably collected 150 balls that tumbled from the tightly packed palm fronds atop the trees that line the fairways.

The Sixth Hole at the Bobby Jones Golf Course in Sarasota gave up about a dozen balls in Hurricane Irma's winds. Photograph courtesy of Bobby Jones Golf Club and the Sarasota Observer.

The Sixth Hole at the Bobby Jones Golf Course in Sarasota gave up about a dozen balls in Hurricane Irma's winds.

Photograph courtesy of Bobby Jones Golf Club and the Sarasota Observer.

The course on Fruitville Road came through the storm fairly well, according the city of Sarasota.  Martin said 17 trees fell, but none of them are in play. Crews are in the process of removing them and clearing debris from around the property.  Martin said the course’s 6-inch rain gauge filled up between Saturday and Tuesday, so at least that much rain fell, but the water is receding.

She said she hopes the British course will be ready by Friday morning, but the American might take a little longer.

Oh, and the penalty for hitting a ball semi-permanently into a tree?

It’s either a lost ball (if you can’t see it) or an unplayable lie (if you can). Either way,  It’s one stroke.

NEW BOBBY JONES PLAN NEARING COMPLETION

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY ZACK MURDOCK

ZACH.MURDOCK@HERALDTRIBUNE.CoM

SARASOTA - With a plan to revamp Sarasota’s Bobby Jones Golf Club just a few weeks from completion, city officials and their consultant on the project are still fine-tuning every last detail.

That means what the city is affectionately calling the 100 percent master plan for its historic municipal course is unlikely to remain that way, joked city consultant and golf course architect Richard Mandell.

This is the plan, and it will be the basis of what I present to the City Commission next month along with my full report,” he said. “But once that goes out, I know people are going to have a field day with it. I expect plenty of new suggestions and ideas after that presentation, and that’s what this process is all about, and we can keep adjusting; we’ve just got to get it right.”

At the center of Mandell’s plan for the three-course, 45-hole complex are course renovations, a new clubhouse and the reimagining of the nine-hole executive course on the west side of Circus Boulevard there. He envisions turning the area into an "adjustable course," driving range and extra practice facilities as a learning center for new or young golfers.

He and the city’s parks advisory board spent almost two hours on the would-be complete master plan on Thursday night, trying to workshop ideas for possible alternative locations for the planned new driving range and entirely rebuilt clubhouse — each with a smattering of pros and cons.

Moving the driving range to the eastern end of all the courses could be a problem with the canals running across the property or could leave one of the two 18-hole courses a few yards short of regulation, Mandell said. But leaving it along Circus Boulevard would require a shorter range and netting, both of which raised red flags with golfers and the course’s Glen Oaks neighbors, he admitted.

The city also could consider inching the new clubhouse closer to the road or farther north to make more space behind and around it, depending on their preference or worries about a temporary clubhouse structure, Mandell added.

The course’s representative on the parks board, Shawn Pierson, who leads the Friends of the Bobby Jones Golf Club and has passionately worked for years on plans for the course, advocated strongly for further tinkering on the driving range’s location. But the idea got little support from the parks board, and Bobby Jones General Manager Sue Martin said City Manager Tom Barwin also favors the current design.

I think we’re still in the solving-the-puzzle phase, versus selecting from among one of three or four options,” Pierson said. “We’re just now looking at the options and starting to digest them.”

Mandell is scheduled to present his final recommendations to the City Commission for review on Aug. 21. The city hired Mandell at the beginning of the year for $115,000 and will receive a lengthy, technical report along with the conceptual design.

There are limitations to this site that, no matter what we choose, will keep it from being what everybody wants,” Mandell told the parks board. “The solution I’m showing, because we’ve studied all this, is the better solution.”

Golfers’ yearslong hopes of upgrading the course lie under the cloud of financial uncertainty, though.

Mandell has not yet presented cost estimates for his concept, but the price tag is expected to be a multimillion dollar investment. His final report to the commission, to be made available shortly before the meeting, will include specific cost figures, he said Thursday.

The recommendations will land in the middle of ongoing discussions about the city’s budget, including a first-ever subsidy to the golf club. 

Bobby Jones has struggled financially since the economic downturn and has asked for a $425,000 transfer from city coffers in 2018 to prop up its $2.8 million budget.

City staff thinks officials have to spend money to make money at Bobby Jones. Photograph courtesy of the Sarasota Observer.

City staff thinks officials have to spend money to make money at Bobby Jones. Photograph courtesy of the Sarasota Observer.

IN THE ROUGH: BOBBY JONES FACES REVENUE CHALLENGES

THURSDAY, JULY 13, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

IS AN INFUSION OF CASH INTO BOBBY JONES GOLF CLUB ENOUGH TO TURN THE MUNICIPAL COURSE INTO A MONEYMAKER FOR THE CITY?

BY DAVID CONWAY, DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

If the City Commission approves staff’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2017-18, taxpayers will fund a $425,000 subsidy to Bobby Jones Golf Club — a facility whose reserves have run dry for the first time officials can recall.

The deterioration of Bobby Jones is an oft-discussed subject at City Hall. City staff say the 45-hole municipal facility, located on the east end of town, is suffering because its infrastructure dates back to the 1980s. The irrigation is bad. The drainage is bad.

As a result, the course tends to be in rough shape, too. The city replaced the greens on both 18-hole courses at Bobby Jones, and General Manager Sue Martin said that $500,000 investment has more than paid off. But golfers still grouse about the conditions of the fairways, and the estimated income from greens fees declined by about $20,000 over last year.

City staff isn’t denying there are problems with the way the course has operated during the past decade. As they asked for that $425,000 subsidy from the city’s general fund at a budget workshop in June, they made clear that Bobby Jones will continue to struggle if nothing changes.

“Over the last 10 years, the golf course has been in decline, and the capital influx hasn’t been there to compete with the golf courses in the area,” Martin said.

That capital influx, officials hope, is the key to turning around the fortunes of Bobby Jones. On Thursday, golf architect Richard Mandell will unveil his complete master plan for improving the facility at a Parks, Recreation and Environmental Protection Board meeting.

The city hired Mandell in January, paying $115,000 to get advice on how the golf club could be brought up to par. That contract came after a citizen study committee spent nearly a year assessing the needs of Bobby Jones and said the city should invest $14.5 million to improve the facility.

Mandell isn’t making his plans public before Thursday’s meeting because he wants to incorporate input from the advisory board before sharing it with a broader audience. During seven walkthroughs with golfers during his planning process, he’s gotten positive feedback to his vision for Bobby Jones, which is built around maintaining the existing character of the courses while improving the quality.

One thing that won’t be included in Mandell’s plans? A model for how to make Bobby Jones a financially stable business in the wake of any improvements.

Mandell said his expertise is in the physical conditions of the course, and the scope of his contract with the city doesn’t include the operations of the facility.

So, if Bobby Jones gets the “capital influx” staff says it needs, how sure can the city be that the club will stop losing money? Martin said it’s hard to understate the impact of the aging infrastructure the courses use. A rainy day could cost facility two or three days of revenue because the courses are so slow to drain.

It doesn’t help that there’s a lot of attention being given to the decline of the facility,” Martin said. “There could be golfers out there saying, ‘Let’s wait for them to improve it before we go.’”

Martin said staff has begun discussing the need to have a formal business plan in place to go along with any improvements, but she described that as the next step in the planning process.

We can’t get a business plan until we know where we’re going with the master plan,” she said.

Although Mandell didn’t want to get into the specifics of managing the course financially, he shares Martin’s optimism about the club’s ability to succeed following the right improvements. He dismissed a narrative that calls golf a declining sport.

What has happened, he said, is a burst bubble. The number of golf courses expanded beginning in the 1980s, mostly private courses that anchored residential developments. The number of casual golfers increased around that time, and has drawn down since.

Mandell said that has created a real problem for the golf business. Those private courses, struggling to stay afloat, are opening up to the public — and offering rates competitive with municipal facilities.

That all of a sudden does become competition for Bobby Jones, but Bobby Jones has a lot more going for it than these courses,” Mandell said.

The history of the course in the community is a legitimate asset, Mandell said. So are the names associated with it: golfer Bobby Jones and architect Donald Ross, both influential figures in the early history of the sport in America. Both residents and visitors want to golf at Bobby Jones — just not in the current conditions.

People are finding Bobby Jones,” Mandell said.

What they’re finding is a golf course that’s in decline.

Nearly six months after Mandell began his master planning work, many questions remain unanswered. How much will the improvements cost? How long will it take to overhaul the facility? And what, exactly, does a thriving Bobby Jones Golf Club look like from an operations standpoint?

Despite those questions, officials have not shown any signs of wavering in their belief that Bobby Jones is an asset for the city. And Mandell is confident that a high-quality municipal golf facility can succeed in Sarasota.

If the country hears that Bobby Jones has been completely renovated and rebuilt, they’re going to flock,” Mandell said.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

July 11, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER 

This is being referred to as a bailout of Bobby Jones, but we know that Bobby Jones has generated funds that have been rerouted by the City over the years to other areas. So let's look at this as the City repaying the golf course for monies it borrowed from the club.

There was no mention of taxpayer dollars to fund the capital improvements in discussions other than from misinformed individuals. What has been discussed was Florida Department of Environmental Protection and Florida Historical Preservation grants which protect the environment and protect the history of Florida. The rest of the funds were proposed to come from a REVENUE bond secured by the future revenues of the golf course which industry data for municipal golf courses show would support this. Certainly a public private partnership should be explored but only with the right companies.

Troon, for instance, struggled with Legacy Golf Club and there are other instances of private management failures in the area. These companies are profit driven and it is important to find the right fit, especially in a municipal golf course environment.

Environmentally, as we have mentioned many times before, this project will result in significant improvements to the water quality of Phillippi Creek and Sarasota Bay.

From a historical standpoint this golf course is the most significant historical asset the City has and is a key destination on the Florida Historic Golf Trail when operating properly. If you are truly vested in your community this history should be important to you!

Municipal courses in Coral Gables, Miami Shores, Ft Myers, Orlando and other areas have gone through major improvements to great success. These are the examples we should be looking at not major cities in other regions that really aren't comparable to Sarasota. Florida municipalities have the same basic characteristics, are located in the same region of the country and have the same need to attract golfing retirees.

People have no problem with taxpayers funding parks that generate no revenue but when it comes to one that does, the largest park which happens to be a golf club, its "oh no we can't do that", even though it would pay for itself. Seriously??

The answer maybe with private management but make no mistake the answer is yes we need to move forward with this project but as part of the plan demand that the City fixes the many operational problems that are beating the club in to the ground.

Dan M. Smith, Chairman, Bobby Jones Golf Course Study Committee, Sarasota; and Treasurer and Trustee, Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, Inc.

BOBBY JONES COURSE NEEDS CHANGE, NOT BAILOUT

THURSDAY, JULY 6, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

BY ADRIAN MOORE, CONTRIBUTOR

The city-owned Bobby Jones Golf Club has been going downhill for years. Unable to compete with many much nicer and similarly priced golf properties around Sarasota, it just can’t bring in the golfers needed to pay for running it, let alone improving it.

The course has only brought revenue above operating costs one year out of the past eight, losing over $1.3 million in recent years and consuming all of its reserves. So it’s no surprise that this year they have come to the City Commission to “humbly ask for a subsidy out of the general fund.” They anticipate a loss of $287,000 in the coming year unless they raise fees or get a bailout from the non-golfing taxpayers.

Note this comes after the city spent $115,000 to hire a golf architect to propose a multimillion dollar plan to upgrade the complex. Those millions will come, you guessed it, from the non-golfing taxpayers.

Given that Bobby Jones hasn’t been able to compete against other golf courses for many years, it makes no sense for city taxpayers to bail them out or spend millions to rebuild a losing competitor. The Bobby Jones Golf Club was once nice, but it lost the competition with rivals. Making it nice again, but keeping the same management, is repeating the same thing and expecting a different result, and we all know what that is the definition of …

So I am going to repeat what I said a year ago. The city should look into a private golf company to take over management of Bobby Jones under contract. Let a company that runs golf courses all over the nation, and makes money with them, invest its money in the improvements, rather than gambling taxpayer dollars. They would do the marketing to bring in more golfers and reap the rewards if they succeed — but also bear the costs if they fail. This kind of arrangement puts the risk of success or failure on the private firm, where it belongs, not on city taxpayers. But the city retains ownership of the course and control of rates and policies through the contract.

Cities like Chicago and Phoenix have done exactly this a few years ago and have experienced great success. The City Commission should look at this winning idea instead of spending millions on a failed formula.

FORE!  BOBBY JONES NEEDS $425,000

FOR THE FIRST TIME, HISTORIC 45-HOLE COMPLEX REQUIRES HELP FROM THE CITY'S GENERAL FUND

THE MUNICIPAL COURSES ARE PROJECTING A $287,000 LOSS NEXT YEAR AND HAVE ONLY TURNED A PROFIT ONCE SINCE THE RECESSION

MONDAY, JUNE 26, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY ZACK MURDOCK

ZACH.MURDOCK@HERALDTRIBUNE.CoM

SARASOTA - The Bobby Jones Golf Club needs $425,000 in city subsidies to prop up its $2.8 million budget next year as golfers and city leaders await a final master plan to revamp the historic municipal complex.

It will be the first time the three-course, 45-hole complex requires help from the city’s largely property-tax funded general fund while it grapples with the same declines facing the entire golf industry, said Sue Martin, the club’s general manager.

This is the first year we’ve had to come in front of the City Commission and humbly ask for a subsidy out of the general fund,” Martin told the commission during budget workshops last week. “Over the last, probably 10 years, the golf course has been in decline and the capital influx has not been there to compete with our neighbor golf courses.”

The golf course is projecting a $287,000 loss in the coming year and has only turned a profit once since 2009 — in 2011 — and the heart of the economic downturn, according to city documents.

If we don’t keep our golf course in playable condition — and that is our product, the golf course is our product — we can’t get the price point in order to cover all of our expenses,” Martin said. “Basically it’s come down to, we are looking at the general fund.”

The first subsidy will allow the club, which hosts roughly 115,000 golfers each year, to forgo large jumps in green fees and cart rentals to try to make up the difference, Martin said.

I think a municipal golf course really serves a purpose,” she said. “We invite and welcome any and all golfers, at all levels, all economic status and we’d like to keep our price point so that it is available for just the normal person to come golf. But the tradeoff is that we will need a subsidy.”

In an effort to reduce costs further, Parks and Recreation Director Jerry Fogle is working with the course’s landscaping and maintenance company to cut about $100,000 out of its contract without reducing maintenance of the courses themselves.

The subsidy request comes just ahead of the unveiling of a new master plan to overhaul the 90-year-old club following two years of review and debate.

Golf architect Richard Mandell is expected to present his final recommendations to the city’s parks board, which helps oversee Bobby Jones, and the City Commission in mid- to late July. The commission hired Mandell for $115,000 earlier this year. 

So far Mandell has detailed parts of his planned proposals at several workshops, including redesigning the nine-hole Gillespie Course as an "adjustable golf course" with a learning center for new or young golfers.

Although the plans have received some positive feedback, the price tag for major changes to the club remains to be seen.

Once the commission hears Mandell’s pitch, it will have to determine how much of his plan to implement and how to pay for it. That could mean spreading the changes out in phases over several years, Martin suggested.

The project also would have to be added to a growing and expensive to-do list, which now includes the potential purchase of the Players Centre for Performing Arts  and the eventual big ticket costs of the Bayfront 20:20 plan.

But Fogle and Martin agreed the recommendations should be implemented, however possible, to try to restore course.

Obviously the main thing is getting the master plan hopefully approved and trying to figure out a way to fund this master plan, so we don’t throw it on the shelf and do nothing with it,” Fogle said. “Bobby Jones is a historic golf course and ... I want it to be the world class golf course that it once was, that the city could be proud of.”

A Master Plan for Bobby Jones Golf Club attempts to maintain the character of the two 18-hole courses.  PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF YOUROBSERVER.COM

A Master Plan for Bobby Jones Golf Club attempts to maintain the character of the two 18-hole courses.  PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF YOUROBSERVER.COM

GOLF ARCHITECT OUTLINES BOBBY JONES OVERHAUL

THURSDAY, MAY 25, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

Richard Mandell says Bobby Jones Golf Club needs major infrastructure upgrades, but the character of the courses don’t have to change for the facility to succeed.

BY DAVID CONWAY, DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

After completing 90% of the design work for a Bobby Jones Golf Club master plan, golf architect Richard Mandell’s vision for the course doesn’t involve too many radical changes — on the surface, at least.

Most of the more significant alterations he’s recommending are contained to the Gillespie Executive Course west of Circus Boulevard, which he wants to transform into a training area with a larger driving range. But on the American and British courses, Mandell wants to preserve the character of the 36 holes while improving the conditions for golfers.

In the past week, Mandell has provided a series of updates on his master plan for the city-owned facility. On Tuesday, he held a pair of workshops at Bobby Jones, where the public could provide feedback on the plans.

The city has expressed a desire to reinvigorate Bobby Jones as both revenue and the number of rounds played at the course have declined annually. In 2015, a citizen advisory committee recommended $14.5 million in improvements. In January, the city approved a $115,000 contract with Richard Mandell Golf Architecture to develop a master plan.

Mandell has affirmed one of the findings of the study committee: Bobby Jones is in need of major structural improvements. One of his priorities is improving drainage on the course, which includes adding five acres of flood control to the 325-acre site. He recommends achieving that by building ponds and dry basins that, in conjunction with raising some of the low-lying holes, is designed to redirect water away from the playing area.

Beyond the natural drainage improvements, Mandell said the course needs to be rebuilt from the ground up, for the irrigation and drainage systems at Bobby Jones have outlived their useful lifespan. He thinks infrastructure upgrades would address many complaints about the facility.

“They don’t like the drainage problems, the lack of sand in some of the bunkers,” Mandell said. “They like the general character of the golf course.”

Mandell repeatedly referred to the distinct characters of the two 18-hole courses at Bobby Jones. Golfers told him the American Course is shorter, designed for “target golf” with a lot of water throughout. The British Course, by contrast, is longer, sleepier and has relatively little water.

Within these 36 holes, he’s recommending a change that would allow staff to dynamically arrange two 18-hole courses on a day-to-day basis. Dividing them into four nine-hole segments, Mandell suggests staff could have golfers play the front nine of the American and the back nine of the British, or other combinations.

Beyond that, the changes are minor. He recommends lengthening both courses, and creating seven different tee boxes for each hole to accommodate golfers of various ability levels. He wants to make sure the holes are more clearly defined, too, for both safety and playability reasons.

The golfers at Tuesday’s workshops shared largely positive feedback. Sheila Schwabl plays at Bobby Jones twice a week, and she said the proposed changes strike a good balance between preserving what’s good about the course and making much-needed improvements to a deteriorating facility.

“It’s been a tough year for the fairways, that’s for sure,” Schwabl

Mandell said he’s strived to keep the public engaged. 

“If you listen to what people want and try to figure out how to accommodate them, the rest of the process is a breeze," he said.

There’s no solid estimate on the cost or timeline of the improvements at this point. Mandell said it should take no more than a year to improve an 18-hole segment of the facility, and that any improvements would likely be conducted in phases. He said the budget figures he’d seen thrown around in the past — including the $14.5 million the committee presented — were probably “somewhat in the ballpark.”

Mandell is scheduled to present a final report to the City Commission in July. On its own, he said even a major investment won’t be enough to secure the facility’s long-term success.

“Once this is done and the shot in the arm is there, the key is for the city to stand behind it and give people the resources to keep it from slipping like it had in the past,” Mandell said.

The City is exploring the possibility of making significant improvements to the municipal golf course.  PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF YOUROBERSERVER.COM

The City is exploring the possibility of making significant improvements to the municipal golf course.  PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF YOUROBERSERVER.COM

CITY TO BRIEF GOLFERS ON BOBBY JONES PLANS

MONDAY, MAY 22, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

A consultant is 90% done with a master plan for Bobby Jones Golf Club. On Tuesday, he’ll present his ideas to the public during two workshops.

BY DAVID CONWAY, DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

Before golf architect Richard Mandell lays out his vision for the future of Bobby Jones Golf Club to the City Commission, you’ll have a chance to share your thoughts on his master plan for the city-owned course.

On Tuesday, Mandell will lead two presentations about the master plan at Bobby Jones. The plans are approximately 90% complete.

If You Go

What: Bobby Jones Golf Club master plan discussion
When: 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Tuesday, May 23
Where: Bobby Jones Golf Club conference room, 1000 Circus Blvd.

Mandell has provided two public updates on his work in the past two months. In April, at a City Commission workshop, he shared a plan for the land on which the nine-hole Gillespie Executive Course sits. The proposed changes focused on adding practice facilities while maintaining a short nine-hole course.

On Thursday, Mandell made a presentation to the city’s Parks, Recreation and Environmental Protection Board. The update included a discussion of potential drainage improvements and changes to the layout of the 18-hole American and British courses.

In January, the city agreed to a $115,000 contract with Richard Mandell Golf Architecture to develop master plan for the course. As the annual number of rounds played at the course has declined, the commission has expressed an interest in refreshing the property.

A citizen study committee suggested the city should invest as much as $14.5 million to update the course.

GOLF: FOX COMPLETES COMEBACK FOR CITY TITLE 

MAY 7, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

He closes with 71 to edge Knight by a stroke

BY JIM BROCKMAN, CORRESPONDENT

SARASOTA

K.C. Fox found himself nine strokes off the lead following the first round of this year’s City of Sarasota Men’s Golf Championship.

A lesser competitor might have quietly faded away and waited until next year.

But the 57-year-old came roaring back with sizzling rounds of 66 and 68 after a dismal opening round of 77 to trail co-leaders Bradley Knight and Scott Cox by a single stroke, heading into Sunday’s final round.

Fox fired a solid 1-under par 71 on Sunday to finish 6-under for the tournament at 282, edging the 26-year-old Knight, who played his high school golf at Riverview, by a single stroke.

Knight’s 1-over 73 on Sunday was his only round of the tournament, held annually on the British Course at the venerable 90-year-old Bobby Jones Golf Club, that wasn’t under par.

Cox, who fired a third-round best 5-under 67 on Saturday, finished with a 78 Sunday to wind up at even-par 288.

Three-time City champion Phil Walters and Ray Wenck were tied at 286, four shots behind Fox.

“It’s a tough tournament over 72 holes, on a tough golf course,” Fox said. “There are a lot of good players. You’ve got to be patient. I think patience was my main virtue out there today. I didn’t get frustrated about anything.”

Fox’s patience was certainly tested when he shot his disappointing first-round 77 nine days ago. He suffered a quadruple bogey on the par-4 fifth hole.

“You need to have a good attitude,” Fox said. “I’ve been working on my attitude and mental game a lot more the past few years since I turned a senior. That as much as anything has helped my game.

“You need to know your game. What you can do and what you can’t do. Staying in the moment, those type of things help you with any victory.”

Fox, who has lived in Sarasota the past 20 years, was playing in his 17th City of Sarasota tournament. It was his first victory.

“This is a pretty big win,” Fox said. “I’ve had some big wins in my career. I just try to keep the same thought process the entire 18 holes.”

Fox birdied three of the course’s four par-5′s on Sunday. His key shot of the day was saving par with a clutch six-foot putt on No. 17.

“You’ve got to stay in shape, and I work on my flexibility a lot,” Fox said. “That is what helps me to keep hitting the ball long. After playing competitive golf for 45 years, maybe I’m finally getting the hang of it.”

Ryan Jaso shot a final-round 74 to finish the tournament with a 5-over 293 to win the first flight on Sunday. Brandon Johnson was second, three shots behind Jaso after shooting a 74.

Jiri Curzydlo’s tournament total was 303, winning the second flight by three strokes over Tim Judy and Nicolas Schwenger.

Mike Miller shot an even-par 72 on Sunday to win the third flight at 313, four strokes better than Rob Manoogian.

Tyler Redmond ran away with the fourth flight, finishing with a total of 329. It was 10 strokes better than Toby Snelson, Nick Exarhou and Ted Roberts.

BOBBY JONES IMPROVEMENTS COULD EXPAND PRACTICE SPACE

THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

During the Bobby Jones Golf Club master planning process, a golf architect has located space to build a larger training facility.

BY DAVID CONWAY, DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR

The driving range at Bobby Jones Golf Club is so short that staff encourages some golfers not to use their driver.

It’s not even technically called a driving range — it’s a “practice range,” Bobby Jones General Manager Sue Martin said.

The practice facilities at the city-owned golf course have been a target of criticism. Even City Manager Tom Barwin was surprised by the conditions when he visited the range with his sons.

“I thought one of them was going to hit me with their stick,” Barwin said.

As the city works with a master planner to develop a new vision for Bobby Jones, improving and expanding the practice options has become a priority. On Tuesday, golf architect Richard Mandell presented an update on that master planning process at a City Commission workshop.

Richard Mandell is finalizing a master plan for the entirety of the city-owned golf facility.  PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF YOUROBERSERVER.COM

Richard Mandell is finalizing a master plan for the entirety of the city-owned golf facility.  PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF YOUROBERSERVER.COM

Mandell has honed in on the nine-hole Gillespie Executive Course, the one segment located west of Circus Boulevard, as a location for training facilities. He presented three options for reshaping that segment of the property. All three options include a larger driving range — 270 yards long instead of 235 — putting and chipping greens, and a short nine-hole course.

The three options mainly differ in the scope of that course:

  • Option 1 would create a standard par-3 course.
  • Option 2 would create a shorter pitch-and-putt course.
  • Option 3 would create an adjustable par-3 course.

The adjustable course would allow staff to create different configurations for the course on different days. Mandell said this type of adjustable course is not unheard of in golf design, but he hasn’t heard of a facility like Bobby Jones using the concept.

“It’s not often utilized,” Mandell said. “I have no idea why that is.”

He said the idea would help Bobby Jones stand out as it competes for customers with other local golf facilities. Members of the City Commission — although professed non-golfers — were excited by the potential marketability of the adjustable practice course.

“I don’t play a lot of golf, but if I did, it would be appealing to me,” Commissioner Liz Alpert said.

Mandell said the adjustable course would come with more maintenance, because there would be more fairway space. 

The planning process for Bobby Jones is still ongoing. The city approved a $115,000 contract with Mandell in January, with a deadline to complete a plan by May.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

THURSDAY, APRIL 6, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER 

I was very pleased with the time I spent with Richard and the progress report he gave displayed his great talent and could create a very special piece to the overall restoration of the Club.  

As he focuses now on the main 36 holes expect designs that will be enjoyable to play yet challenging, give you several options for length, be aesthetically pleasing, respectful of the natural surroundings and very practical for maintenance purposes and dealing with the awful storm water issues they now have. With Bobby Jones's connection to Phillippi Creek and the local fisheries an exciting piece to this will be natural systems that filter the water that dumps in to the creeks and will ultimately enhance the quality of our waterways.

Dan M. Smith, Chairman, Bobby Jones Golf Course Study Committee, Sarasota and Treasurer and Trustee, Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, Inc.

Bobby Jones architect calls for ‘adjustable’ course 

TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

Proposal is part of a redesign of the 90-year-old Sarasota course.  

BY ELIZABETH DJINIS, STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA - Sarasota could become one of the first cities to have an adjustable municipal golf course, should the initial designs of the city’s golf architect come to fruition.

At a City Commission workshop Tuesday night, architect Richard Mandell updated the group on his progress since being hired in early January for $115,000 to draw up plans to redesign the 90- year-old Bobby Jones Golf Club. In his presentation, Mandell focused primarily on the changes he would make to the Gillespie Course, the property’s nine-hole course. There, he proposed a new learning center, a building for newcomers to the sport and experienced players alike to learn new aspects of the game, the driving range and additional parking, with one notable addition: a nine- hole golf course that Bobby Jones staffers could adjust depending on the day or type of player.

“People have done adjustable golf courses before in the world, but I don’t think it’s ever been used as a practice facility in such a prime piece of property,” Mandell told the commission. “This is something that would really make the city of Sarasota stand out as a golf facility that rivals anything.”

While the commission does not vote on any decisions at workshops, most of the board seemed pleased with Mandell’s early results. Commissioner Suzanne Atwell asked whether this strategy had been tested before.

“I wouldn’t call it a new concept, but it’s a rare concept,” Mandell said. “This is rare but it’s not infeasible, and it’s something that, for all golfers, you’re going to capture their attention.” 

Before his designs, Mandell conducted a series of golf course walkthroughs with interested parties and heard from almost 75 people regarding their thoughts on the course. The feedback he received ranged from a desire for better fairways to restoring the course to the original plans of 1920s designer Donald Ross.

The course’s assistant general manager, Christian Martin, sat in the chambers as Mandell showed the commission his initial plans. Martin had been consulted throughout the process and noted previously that one of his key priorities was an improved practice facility. As the presentation finished, Martin was practically beaming.

“We’re really excited — you can feel the excitement in the air,” Martin said. “Bobby Jones needs a rebranding.”

Mayor Willie Shaw noted that the adjustable golf course would be an asset to new and old golfers, another way to both introduce people to and keep people interested in a game that has been dwindling in popularity in recent years.

“I think that the Gillespie addition brings new energy to the conversation and going forward with this renovated Bobby Jones,” Shaw said. “I always say, we got what nobody else has, and that is Bobby Jones.” 

Fix bobby jones

letter to the editor

SaturDAY, MArch 4, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

Fix Bobby Jones

Award-winning golf-course architect Richard Mandell is working on a long-awaited master plan for Bobby Jones Golf Club. I spent some time with Richard and I am very pleased with his approach.

This historic and cherished municipal club desperately needs a major overhaul to restore its past prominence. Unfortunately this facility has been overlooked for years and the time has come to make the investment that will create a thriving center for golf activities in a community suffering a decline in its reputation as a top golf destination.

A 2015 City Commission-appointed committee studied material that clearly demonstrated the path to success is a capital improvement plan that will overhaul the courses, establish a golf training center and build a new modern and more functional clubhouse. The financial data supports the plan.

There was some support for what I believe is the best move, to restore the original Donald Ross course making it more playable and more interesting and to give a strong nod to a glorious history that most golfers don't know about. With 36 holes we have the opportunity to pair it with a modern design to give players a wonderful experience of playing two unique layouts.

A question lingers in the minds of local golfers about Bobby's future. Because of this sentiment I believe that, if the city means business, it owes a strong statement of commitment to all who have waited so long. We want our cradle of golf back!

Dan M. Smith, Chairman, Bobby Jones Golf Course Study Committee, Sarasota and Treasurer and Trustee, Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, Inc.

Richard Mandell  PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF YOUROBERSERVER.COM

Richard Mandell  PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF YOUROBERSERVER.COM

AWARD-WINNING GOLF ARCHITECT TALK HIS PLAN for BOBBY JONES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2017

SARASOTA OBSERVER

PROSE AND KOHN: RYAN KOHN.

BY RYAN KOHN, SPORTS REPORTER

If you have been out to Bobby Jones Golf Club lately, you’ve probably noticed that things could do with an upgrade, both on the club’s 45 total holes and in the clubhouse.

Well, your prayers have been answered, and something of a holy figure in the golf architecture world is the one answering them.

Richard Mandell has been hired to completely re-do the course. Mandell’s courses have won Golf Inc.’s Municipal Renovation of the Year award two years in a row, and won a similar award from Golf Magazine in 2014.

Legendary designer Donald Ross laid out the original 18 holes in 1925. For anyone worried about what Mandell might turn the course into, fear not. 

"I don't want to turn it into anything,” Mandell said. “I want to return it to its peak of greatness. Part of that is rebuilding the infrastructure of the site so that it’s more functional, and improving conditions, and recapturing some of the great strategic charm of the golf course. Bunker locations, hazards that challenge golfers more than penalize golfers.

“In the world of golf, people have lost their way as it relates to fun and strategy and focused more on aesthetics. I want the place to look great, and that is part of my vision, but I don’t want it to just be a place to get great views. Form follows function. It has to serve a purpose of creating an activity. We don’t want to create something that is an art piece at all, really. We want something that is about playing golf.”

Mandell identified two main areas where the course needs improving the most: The fairway grass, and drainage. He seemed excited at the prospect of that last issue, though. There are lots of ways to get creative with drainage, including habitats for wildlife and storm water retention for surrounding communities, Mandell said.

It’s not just the course itself that is getting a makeover. The entire clubhouse is getting built from scratch. Michael Bryant, a subcontractor on Mandell’s team who works mainly as a clubhouse architect, will be assisting with that job. Bryant previously worked on The Lodge at Country Club East in Lakewood Ranch, which was awarded the Golden Fork second prize by Golf Inc. in the “new, private” category.

At a morning Feb. 7 meeting with Mandell and Bryant, golfers gave their opinions on what they would like to see in the new clubhouse. While none of the ideas are official (and will not be for at least a few months), it is clear that people want Bobby Jones to be more of a community center than it has been in the past. Even if you don’t play golf at all, you should be able to head to the center once or twice a month and find something fun to do, whether that be grabbing dinner, taking a class in a classroom or dancing at a party.

There is also a fervor for showing off the course’s history and place in Sarasota golf’s heart.

“The locals feel that this is the center of Sarasota golf,” Mandell said. “There has been talk long before I showed up that maybe this could be the spot for a Sarasota golf Hall of Fame. I think it’s a great idea. I think the history should permeate throughout the building, but I also think there should be some sort of permanent display.”

Mandell won’t have the final word on that decision, but his opinion carries a lot of weight. There is certainly Bobby Jones history worth telling, not just of the player, but of the course — Even George Herman “Babe” Ruth teed off there, after all.

The master plan process, or the renovation business plan process, as Mandell calls it, has a notice to proceed deadline of May 1. That’s the date when the full master plan and its hard numbers will be revealed to city officials.

Until then, Mandell and Bryant will stay hard at work on implementing all the changes the public wants to see while revitalizing the spirit that made Bobby Jones so special. Get excited, golf fans.

GOLF ARCHITECT ADDRESSES BOBBY JONES PRIORITIES

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

Golfers and management are looking for better fairways and a new practice facility. 

BY ELIZABETH DJINIS, STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA -

As the city's newly hired golf architect considers a master plan for the Bobby Jones Golf Club, he's faced with two key priorities based on feedback from golfers and the complex's management: better fairways and a new practice facility.

In a series of tours recently, architect Richard Mandell led golfers around parts of the 45-hole municipal facility, asking for feedback on the general environment and architecture as well as specific holes. From these six tours and meetings with various staff, Mandell said one thing was resoundingly clear.

"Without a doubt, the quality of the fairways and the surfaces of the fairways, as far as smoothness and grass, was No. 1, along with drainage," Mandell said. "And everybody noted how the course is pretty unplayable in the summer because of drainage."

Hired by the city in early January for $115,000 to create a new master plan this spring for Sarasota's historic 90-year-old golf complex, Mandell is very early in the planning process. He said he is collecting his notes and getting a sense of his limitations with the course. Then he will begin drafting a preliminary design. Either way, it is clear that he's interested in a proposal for a better practice facility, which may mean better golf for everyone in Sarasota.

Mandell will present his final report this spring. The City Commission will then consider how to move forward and at what potential cost.

Reviewing the holes

On a bright afternoon, at least 10 people, mostly men and many dressed in the golfer's uniform of a polo shirt and khakis, traversed nine holes of the American Course with Mandell, noting what they liked and disliked about each hole.

In a meeting before the tour, many of the golfers noted their love of the course, with one even saying, "One of the reasons I moved to Sarasota was because I enjoyed playing here so much."

But most agreed that the course has suffered since its heyday, deteriorating to the point that one man said he would be embarrassed to bring his friends. While many of the golfers pushed for the improved fairways, the complex's assistant general manager, Christian Martin, said there's one major initiative on his mind: getting a better practice facility.

"That would be a place where people get introduced to the game," Martin said. "Right now, we don't have a world-class short game, but it's something we've aspired to." 

Although much of Mandell's tour focused on the course, he said later that the practice facility would certainly be under his purview and is definitely something he is considering, especially given the complex's current facility.

"The facility that Bobby Jones has commensurate with the 45 holes is just poor," Mandell said of the course's current practice facility. "It's too poor and the number of golfers that have been through there and that will go through there cannot be accommodated by the 12 or 15 stations they have on that driving range facility. They need something; plus it's an eyesore. To have a world-class practice facility would really be a good boost to the city economically as well." 

New generation?

One of the reasons golf courses have declined in recent years is because of the dwindling popularity of the game.

But Bobby Jones managers hope an improved practice facility would bring more would-be golfers out to the course, allowing for a whole new set of custumers to populate the property.

Mandell said this has become somewhat of a national trend.

"Practice is big in golf right now, because of time constraints more than anything," he said. "People don't have the time to play 18 holes, but they have the time to hit a bucket of balls." 

Mandell said the course should be an asset that attracts people to the game.

"That's what Bobby Jones golf course is all about," Mandell said. "It should be a place where juniors can come and learn the game and a place for them to spend time and play the game.

"It's a city park, and they look at it as a city park with golf on it."

A LETTER TO THE CITY OF SARASOTA FROM THE DONALD ROSS SOCIETY

DRS February 4 2017

SOURCE: THE COST OF UPGRADING SARASOTA'S GOLF COURSE COULD GO INTO THE MILLIONS

WedneSDAY, JANUARY 4, 2017

WWSB My SUNCOAST ABC CHANNEL 7 NEWS

BY RAY COLLINS

SARASOTA - Golf course consultant Richard Mandell will have a busy 12 weeks.  The City of Sarasota is paying him $115,000 to draw up suggestions to improve the Bobby Jones Golf Complex. He realizes when you work on a course that dates back to the 1920's, chances are there may be some issues.

"Left and right of many holes there are ditches that no one worried about in the '30s and '40s. It was wet in the summer because nobody played here. That's different now. When you're running 100,000 [golfers] through here [per year], you have to think drainage, drainage, drainage," Mandell said.

Despite the complex hosting a 100,000 rounds a year, a source close to the complex says it hasn't turned a profit since 2008. Complex General Manager Sue Martin is quick to point out the course doesn't use tax dollars but rather user fees.

"We are still covering our own costs because we've had a fund-balance or a savings account. So we've not needed taxpayers money," Martin pointed out.

However many believe major improvements to the complex will run into the millions of dollars, and at this point, it's not clear where that money would come from.  Some go as as far as to question why the city is in the golf course business at all, especially with other pressing needs in the city.

"I understand their point of view, [but] they have to look at it as a recreational facility, and it's not just a business of running a golf course, it's a quality of life issue. But there's always going to be people who suggest we sell off all different auditoriums, or any of the amenities we offer," Martin said.

We asked the City Hall Spokesperson, Jan Thornburg if she could help us find anybody in city government who we could interview about whether there has been discussion about the City getting out of the golf course business, but she deferred questions back to the person running the golf complex.

GOLF COMPLEX MASTER PLAN  

BOBBY JONES GETS AN ARCHITECT

CITY APPROVES HIRE TO BREATHE LIFE INTO 90-YEAR-OLD FACILITY.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2017

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY ZACK MURDOCK

ZACH.MURDOCK@HERALDTRIBUNE.COM

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated which recommended projects the city funded last year. The city spent almost $240,000 to re-grass the greens on the American course at the municipal complex. 

SARASOTA - Golf course architect Richard Mandell has been hired to create a new master plan this spring for Sarasota's municipal Bobby Jones Golf Course complex.

The project is more than two years in the making as the city, parks leaders and avid golfers have worked to draw up new plans for the course that has struggled through declining popularity and aging infrastructure.

Now Mandell - based in Pinehurst, North Carolina - will spend the next 12 weeks trying to breathe new life into the course through a series of recommendations, wish lists and competing agendas for the historic 90-year-old complex.

The City Commission unanimously approved his hiring Tuesday afternoon for $115,000.

"There are a lot of ideas already to work off of, and we'll do our first course walk-through tomorrow morning," Mandell said after the meeting. "Everyone's trying to work toward making the course the best it can be, so it's all going to come together."

Mandell's plan will include short, mid- and long-term projects and goals for the course and will incorporate recommendations from the citizens' ad hoc committee that suggested the master plan be created in the first place.

That ad hoc committee was formed in late 2014 to study the complex's current and future needs. It recommended last year a spate of improvements estimated to cost $14.5 million, including the renovation of the British and American courses, construction of a new clubhouse and a new master plan for the complex.

The city paid to re-grass the greens on the American course last year and reviewed requests for proposals for the master plan throughout the fall.

Some parks leaders have objected to the plan, though.

Shawn Glen Pierson is the founder of the Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club and has repeatedly asked the commission to reconsider its master plan process since early last summer.

He instead wants the course restored using the original plans drafted by legendary course designer Donald Ross in the 1920s, arguing that playing historic course designs would attract more avid golfers who appreciate the history of Ross courses, which are all across the country.

Pierson also serves as the Bobby Jones representative on the city's Parks, Recreation and Environmental Protection board, known as PREP. The group voted unanimously in July to ask the city, to no avail, to withdraw its request for proposals for the master planner amid questions about how it was drafted and whether city administrators were trying to interfere with what plans would ultimately be made. City leaders denied that suggestion.

Mandell has discussed the master plan process with Pierson and will consider those ideas for the final report, which will set out what kind of improvements could be made in certain price ranges. They and other stakeholders will walk the course and discuss potential recommendations throughout the process.

Mandell will present his final report later this spring. The City Commission will then consider how to move forward and at what potential cost.

BOBBY JONES' GREENS PROBLEM

THE DETERIORATING COURSE HAS PUT STAFF IN A ROUGH SPOT AS THE CITY SEEKS TO DIP INTO AN EARMARKED FUND TO PAY FOR NEW GREENS AT BOBBY JONES.

THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2016

The City has budgeted $300,000 to replace the American Course greens at Bobby Jones Golf Club, dipping into funds reserved for replacing the facility's aging clubhouse. Photograph Courtesy of the Sarasota Observer YourObserver.com

The City has budgeted $300,000 to replace the American Course greens at Bobby Jones Golf Club, dipping into funds reserved for replacing the facility's aging clubhouse. Photograph Courtesy of the Sarasota Observer YourObserver.com

CLASH ON THE COURSE: bobby jones improvements raise questions about funding

SARASOTA OBSERVER

CITIZENS AND CITY OFFICIALS AGREE THAT BOBBY JONES GOLF CLUB IS IN NEED OF SERIOUS UPGRADES. THEY JUST HAVE A DIFFERENT IDEA OF THE BEST COURSE TO TAKE.

BY DAVID CONWAY, NEWS EDITOR

The city of Sarasota is preparing to search for a master planner to help guide the future of Bobby Jones Golf Club after a citizen committee suggested the course needs as much as $14.5 million in improvements.

In the meantime, city staff is responsible for managing and operating a public golf complex that needs as much as $14.5 million in improvements.

These two notions - that Bobby Jones is in dire need of substantial upgrades and that the city must also keep it open on a day-to-day basis - are a source of tension. This was highlighted at the June 6 City Commission meeting, when staff asked to free up money reserved for the replacement of the facility’s aging clubhouse.

When Sarasota voters agreed to renew the 1-cent infrastructure sales tax in 2007, the city included $1.5 million to replace the Bobby Jones clubhouse on the list of projects it intended to complete with that money. Now, staff wants to reallocate some of those funds, which had already been reduced to $1.1 million.

In the hole

As the number of rounds played annually at Bobby Jones has continued to decrease, so too has the public golf course’s reserve fund. Here's how the money available for the facility has declined during the past five years: 

GRAPHIC COURTESY OF YOUROBSERVER.COM

GRAPHIC COURTESY OF YOUROBSERVER.COM

About $300,000 would go toward installing new greens on the American course. Additional money would be allocated toward the master planning effort, a cost estimated anywhere between $25,000 and $100,000.

Sue Martin, general manager of Bobby Jones Golf Club, said the current conditions of the course — both physical and fiscal — are forcing the city to prioritize its needs.

“Golfers will stop coming if you don’t have a good golf course,” Martin said. “They won’t necessarily stop coming only because we have a dated clubhouse.”

Although the commission voted 4-1 to approve staff’s request to reallocate the clubhouse funding, the move didn’t come without questions. Bobby Jones Assistant General Manager Christian Martin said replacing the American greens is in keeping with the recommendations of the Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee, a citizen board that spent 10 months studying the needs of the facility.

Dan Smith, the chairman of the study committee, disagreed with Martin’s assessment. He thought investing in greens was a short-sighted move, because the course could be overhauled in the not-so-distant future.

“Our recommendations called for a complete rebuilding of the golf course, which means the tees, greens and everything would get bulldozed,” Smith said. “Regrassing them now, to me, would be similar to putting carpet in a building you’re going to knock down anyway.”

Martin contested Smith’s assertion. She said that even if the course’s drainage and irrigation systems were replaced, the new grass should remain usable.

There are additional questions about the lifespan of the greens. Staff asserted the new grass could last between eight and 12 years, but when the city undertook a similar effort to replace the British course greens last year, Martin described it as a “short-term (three to five years) solution.”

Surveying the course

George Martin is the secretary of Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, a nonprofit group that is advocating for significant upgrades to the public facility. Although he opposes the use of clubhouse funds to replace the American greens, he understands that the city is in a bind because of the deteriorating course.

What really troubles him, he said, is that there seems to be no consideration of why the city needed to dip into a capital reserve to pay for what he considered fairly standard maintenance.

“You can say, ‘We gotta put some money in, or else nobody will go there for the next two years, and that would be stupid,’” Martin said. “But it’s very dangerous to keep doing it without saying, ‘How the hell did we get to this point?’ And nobody seems to be doing that.”

Although Bobby Jones staff used to keep a distinct operating and capital budget, dwindling reserves ended that practice in 2015. In preliminary budget documents for fiscal year 2017, the city projects a negative fund balance for the Bobby Jones Golf Complex.

There’s a belief — among both city officials and the public - that Bobby Jones can become a positive asset again. Those critical of the decision to reallocate the clubhouse money think the city is committing one of the last pots of money available to a model that isn’t working.

“I think what’s happening today is just a symptom of this larger problem we’ve been dealing with at Bobby Jones for a long time,” said Jay Logan, another member of the Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee. “It’s a business that is failing and that’s in dire need of large capital improvements and better management.”

The city hopes to complete a request for proposals for a master planner for the course by early July. Even when that search formally begins, City Manager Tom Barwin estimates the master planning process could take two to three years.

With a 10-month study of the course recommending a comprehensive overhaul, critics of the city’s approach are distressed by what they see as a lack of urgency. Considering the position the facility is currently in, the need for a new paradigm at Bobby Jones should be obvious, they say.

“Every move the city makes is in defense of the status quo - which is the last thing we need,” said Shawn Pierson, the founder of Friends of Bobby Jones.

Pierson and other citizen advocates for the course remain hopeful the city is committed to significant investments. In the wake of the decision to spend the clubhouse money, they’re pushing to make a reinvigorated Bobby Jones a higher priority for officials.

“Repairs aren’t going to get it done,” Smith said. “If you build a building on a crumbling foundation, it’s eventually going to topple over.”

ESTUARY PROGRAM

MOTE DIPS NET INTO CANAL FISH SURVEY

Mote Marine researchers from left, intern Marzie Wafapoor, staff scientist Jim Locascio, staff scientist Nate Brennan and intern Greer Babbe, close a seine net as they sample fish in the Main B Canal, alongside Bobby Jones Golf Course on Tuesday in Sarasota. Mote researchers are conducting a survey of fish in man-made canals in the Phillippi Creek drainage basin in Sarasota County. Mike Lang Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Mote Marine researchers from left, intern Marzie Wafapoor, staff scientist Jim Locascio, staff scientist Nate Brennan and intern Greer Babbe, close a seine net as they sample fish in the Main B Canal, alongside Bobby Jones Golf Course on Tuesday in Sarasota. Mote researchers are conducting a survey of fish in man-made canals in the Phillippi Creek drainage basin in Sarasota County. Mike Lang Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2016

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY THOMAS BECNEL

THOMAS.BECNEL@HERALDTRIBUNE.COM

SARASOTA - In a canal that runs between Circus Boulevard and the Bobby Jones Golf Club, Mote Marine Laboratory researchers pulled up a seine net and peered in to see what they’d found. 

Well, we got a bass,” said Dr. Nate Brennan on Tuesday morning. “We caught a largemouth — two largemouth bass. Who’d have guessed, huh?"

Mote researchers are conducting the first scientific survey of fish in the canals of Sarasota. The question is how these drainage ditches, which were built for flood control, might be enhanced to benefit fisheries and add to the natural beauty of Sarasota County.

That’s the value of this,” said Dr. James Locascio, manager of the Fisheries Habitat Ecology Program at Mote. “What is the value of these ecosystems and what can we do to enhance that value?"

Recommendations for the canal system could include everything from building small pools to adding marshy plants and shade trees.

The canal survey, funded by the Sarasota Bay Estuary Program, began a month ago and will take another month to complete.

There are more than 100 miles of canals that drain into Phillippi Creek and Sarasota Bay. Tidal waters are an important habitat for sport fish such as snook.

Canals run through popular parks and preserves such as the Celery Fields and Red Bug Slough. For the public, they’re already an amenity.

People walk along and they say, ‘Oh, I saw an otter’ or ‘I saw a blue crab — isn’t that amazing?’ ” said John Ryan, environmental manager for Sarasota County’s Stormwater Environmental Utility. “I hear that all the time."

On Tuesday, at the Main B Canal, Mote researchers demonstrated devices that measure water temperature, salinity and oxygen levels.

Their seine nets pulled in bass, green sunfish and mosquito fish, along with clams, mussels, grass shrimp and a host of other native and exotic species.

I’m looking for a crayfish, but I don’t see any,” Brennan said. “This is a fun project. We always find something new.”

CITY TO PROCEED WITH BOBBY JONES RENOVATION

The starter's shack for the American and British courses at Bobby Jones Golf Club in Sarasota. Herald-Tribune Archive Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

The starter's shack for the American and British courses at Bobby Jones Golf Club in Sarasota. Herald-Tribune Archive Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2016

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY EMILY LE COZ

EMILY.LECOZ@HERALDTRIBUNE.COM

The city will proceed with plans to renovate the Bobby Jones Golf Course as recommended by a citizen-led committee that had studied the municipal complex for nearly a year.

Commissioners on Tuesday unanimously adopted the committee’s full recommendations, which they had first received in a report the committee had submitted last November.

City commissioners formed the group in late 2014 amid concerns about the facility’s “tired” infrastructure and waning popularity. They directed members to study the current status and operation of Bobby Jones and devise a master plan for its long-term future.

Among the group’s recommendations are to hire a master planning firm with experience in professional golf course architecture to consult on the following improvements: the renovation of the British and American courses, the creation of a player-development center and construction a new clubhouse.

The commission also voted to start the process of hiring the master planning firm.

In all, the report calls for $14.5 million in capital improvements. The renovation of both golf courses represents the biggest cost, estimated at $3.75 million each — $7.5 million combined.

It will cost an additional $3.5 million to construct a new clubhouse, which the committee recommends be relocated from the footprint of the original course and placed somewhere else on the property. And a new player development center is estimated at $1.5 million, with contingency costs coming in at $1.75 million.

Bobby Jones needs attention after years of neglect,” committee member Norman Dumaine told commissioners during the public comment period.

Dumaine was joined by other study committee members, many of whom hinted at rumors the city might sell the golf course by reminding commissioners what a jewel they believe the property to be.

It is the largest land asset that the city owns,” said committee vice chairman Rich Kyllonen.

City Manager Tom Barwin acknowledged the uniqueness of the grounds, which occupies more than 300 acres near the city’s northeastern boundaries. He said he wants to make sure the municipality retains ownership of the land in perpetuity.

Because the current commission can’t prevent future commissions from selling the property, Barwin said, the city must find an alternative way to keep the golf course public for years to come.

Commissioners directed staff to look into the matter.

FOX NAMES AZINGER AS LEAD GOLF ANALYST

THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 2016

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

[Sarasota High School alumnus] Paul Azinger has been selected as the lead golf analyst for Fox Sports as it enters the second year of televising the U.S. Open and other USGA championships. Azinger will replace [World Golf Hall of Fame member and former World No. 1] Greg Norman. Fox signed as 12-year deal with the USGA that started last year, and the first big test was the US Open at Chambers Bay. Among the criticism of the broadcast was Norman going flat during the decisive moment when Dustin Johnson three-putted from 12 feet on the last hole for Jordan Spieth to win his second straight major. Azinger is a former PGA champion - he beat Norman, of all people, in a playoff at [Donald Ross designed] Inverness in 1993 - who led the Americans to a rare Ryder Cup victory at Valhalla in 2008. It was the only Ryder Cup the U.S. has won since 1999. Azinger, a Manatee County resident, has made his mark as an analyst for his candor and blunt observations. Azinger, who won 11 times on the PGA Tour, will work with lead announcer Joe Buck at the U.S. Open at Oakmont, along with other USGA events such as the U.S. Women’s Open, U.S. Senior Open and the U.S. Amateur.

PANEL PITCHES $14.5 MILLION OVERHAUL FOR BOBBY JONES GOLF COURSE

Golfers play on the American course at Bobby Jones Golf Complex on Monday. Photographer: Dan Wagner Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Golfers play on the American course at Bobby Jones Golf Complex on Monday. Photographer: Dan Wagner Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune

MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2015

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

By EMILY LE COZ

EMILY.LECOZ@HERALDTRIBUNE.COM

Time is critical for a series of sweeping improvements recommended for the Bobby Jones Golf Course, according to a city-appointed study committee that presented its report Monday at City Hall.

The group pitched $14.5 million in capital improvements to the municipal facility described as “tired” by the National Golf Foundation after a review of the grounds last year.

We are highly recommending that you move quickly on this,” said Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee leader Dan Smith during the presentation. “If we felt we could fix this with just some minor repairs, we wouldn't be here today. It's way beyond time.

City commissioners formed the citizen-led group late last year amid concerns about the facility. They directed members to study the current status and operation of Bobby Jones and devise a master plan for its long-term future.

Members took the mission to heart, holding 30 meetings, listening to 20 experts and studying thousands of pages of research, said Susan Dodd, assistant to the city's finance director.

Among their recommendations are that the city should hire a master planning firm with experience in professional golf course architecture to consult on the following improvements: the renovation of the British and American courses, the creation of a player-development center and the construction a new clubhouse.

The group also suggested the facility raise its fees by $7.50 per round of golf to generate more revenue and that it implement a professional marketing plan.

Commissioners will mull the proposal over the holiday season and could decide how to proceed sometime in January. They generally praised the group's work and voiced support for improving the golf club.

We are not competing with others; others are competing with us,” said Mayor Willie Shaw. “We are Bobby Jones."

The clubhouse restaurant at Bobby Jones Golf Complex.  Photographer: Dan Wagner. Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

The clubhouse restaurant at Bobby Jones Golf Complex.  Photographer: Dan Wagner. Photograph courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

But they also peppered Smith with questions during the two-hour meeting. Commissioners asked how the committee arrived at its recommendations and cost estimates, if it had buy-in from the golf community and why it appeared to deviate from the National Golf Foundation's 2014 report, which had suggested a less comprehensive improvement plan.

The NGF report really missed the big picture that the physical plant has deteriorated so quickly that you've lost 30 percent of your business over a 10-year period,” Smith said.

Annual rounds at the complex dropped from a high of 143,066 rounds in 2007 to less than 102,000 last year, statistics show. The faltering economy spurred some of the decline, as did golf's waning popularity over the years.

I look at the numbers, and I see the drop in play,” Smith said. “I drive by there, and I see the parking lot is not as full as it once was.

Bobby Jones could recapture some of its glory — and its earnings — if the city proceeds with the recommended improvements, Smith said. If not, it will continue its slow decline.

Among the most controversial aspects of the plan is the redesign of the two 18-hole golf courses to “capture the spirit” of the original architect, Donald Ross. Some citizens and committee members had warned against returning the courses to the nearly 90-year-old designs, while others supported the move.

“The question of whether it should be Donald Ross or Donald Duck or anybody is one that should not be answered now,” said former study committee member Clarence Rogers. “It's something the master planner will get to after all of the facts have been unearthed.

The renovation of both golf courses represents the biggest cost, estimated at $3.75 million each – or $7.5 million combined.

Building a golf course is building a golf course,” Smith said. “We know a big part of the cost is going to be irrigation” and drainage.

It will cost an additional $3.5 million to construct a new clubhouse, which the committee recommends be relocated from the footprint of the original course. A new player development center is estimated at $1.5 million, with contingency costs coming in at $1.75 million.

The group predicts the facility will lose $250,000 during improvements because of closures.

The committee also identified several funding sources, including the optional local sales tax, a revenue bond and a grant from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

Vice Mayor Suzanne Atwell raised concerns about creating more bond indebtedness for the city, saying taxpayers are ultimately liable for the repayment.

Not pursuing the bond will be worse, countered study committee member Jay Logan.

If you take the trend of where the business is going at moment, we'll be running a deficit that will equate to the bond debt service,” Logan said. “Doing the bond and reconstructing the golf course should be something that happens.”

The clubhouse at Bobby Jones Golf Complex.  Photographer: Dan Wagner courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

The clubhouse at Bobby Jones Golf Complex.  Photographer: Dan Wagner courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

BOBBY JONES REPORT SCHEDULED FOR MONDAY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2015

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY EMILY LE COZ

EMILY.LECOZ@HERALDTRIBUNE.COM

SARASOTA — The Bobby Jones Golf Course Study Committee will recommend $14.5 million in capital improvements to the municipal facility, according to a long-awaited report scheduled for presentation at a special City Commission meeting Monday.

City commissioners formed the citizen-led group late last year, directing members to study the current status and operation of the golf course and devise a master plan for its long-term future.

Among its recommendations are that the city should hire a professional golf course architect or master planning firm to reconstruct the British and American courses, create a player-development center and build a new clubhouse.

The renovation of both golf courses would cost $7.5 million combined and the two new buildings would cost a total of $5 million, the group estimated in its report.

The committee also identified several funding sources, including the revenue from the optional local sales tax, a bond and a grant from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

It also recommended raising the fees by an average of $7.50 per round of golf to generate an additional $750,000. Fees to play an 18-hole round there currently range from $19 to $47, depending on the season.

The city has considered improvements at Bobby Jones before. It hired National Golf Foundation Consulting in 2008, and again in 2014, to study the golf club, built in 1926 off the northeast corner of Fruitville and Beneva roads in Sarasota.

A LETTER FROM PAUL AZINGER

what does the future hold for BOBBY JONES golf club?

JULY 29, 2015

SARASOTA OBSERVER

Amid privatization talks, the committee tasked with mapping out a plan for the long-term viability of Bobby Jones is keeping all its options on the table.

BY DAVID CONWAY, NEWS EDITOR

Vice Mayor Suzanne Atwell may not be an avid golfer, but that hasn’t stopped her from teeing off on the status quo at Bobby Jones Golf Course.

At a July 13 budget meeting, Atwell read a strongly worded message regarding the future of the city-owned golf course. The Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee, tasked with researching a path to better management for the course, plans to complete its research toward the end of the year, but Atwell wants to see more immediate results.

She also wants to be clear with her expectations for the course, which she thinks must earn a profit to justify its operation by the city.

City taxpayers should not subsidize the golfing costs of a clientele, most of whom are not city residents, and where many local golf courses are available to non-members,” Atwell said.

For years, Bobby Jones has drawn criticism for its increased maintenance and capital costs and lack of corresponding rise in revenue. The commission officially formed the golf club study committee in February, assigning seven area residents with the task of researching the best practices for the municipal course, possibly in advance of a formal master planning process.

When budget talks began this summer, Atwell was frustrated with what she saw as unrealistic revenue projections for the course — and the lack of substantive progress from the study committee as the city made its financial plans for the next year. Atwell stressed that she is a big fan of the course and wants to see it succeed, but also wants to make sure it’s operating in the black, either on its own or by a partnership with another entity.

If, by the beginning of 2016, the city has developed no clear plan for the future of Bobby Jones, Atwell suggested a private vendor could be the best option for managing the operations of the club.

I want the advisory committee to come up with some very creative, responsible decisions that are not on the backs of the taxpayers,” Atwell said.

In addition to the missive from Atwell, the board has been working without its original chairman following John Bondur’s resignation in April. Still, the group is confident that it’s proceeding in the right direction, and plans to consider all options available.

Clarence Rogers, the new chairman of the committee, said it was too early to comment on Atwell’s comments regarding the best management structure for the course. Still, in the five months the committee has been operational, the group has heard first-hand accounts that municipal courses can still run efficiently.

We've certainly received information from folks who have testified from other venues that it certainly is and has been the case in other places,” Rogers said. “We know it can be done.”

In addition to the capital and infrastructure improvements the course has needed for years, Bobby Jones is also suffering from an increased amount of competition from other local courses. With some public courses offering lower rates than the municipal club — and well-equipped private courses opening up their facilities to the public to generate more revenue — Bobby Jones needs to create its own niche in the market.

The business of golf these days is very tough,” Rogers said. “You have to consider all aspects of competition. That's reflected in the pricing and the amenities and so on.”

At the golf club study committee’s July 23 meeting, the board began a dialogue with one potential partner to help reshape the future of Bobby Jones: Visit Sarasota County. Virginia Haley, the tourism group’s president, agreed that despite the popularity of recreational golf in the region, the municipal course needed to first develop its own distinct identify before tourism funding and marketing could enter the equation.

I think you have to create that unique proposition,” Haley said.

PROPOSED CITY BUDGET KEEPS TAX RATE FLAT

TUESDAY, JULY 14, 2015

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY ZAC ANDERSON 

SARASOTA — Boosting city commissioner’s salaries, privatizing the city-owned Bobby Jones Golf Club and deferring payments on a troubled new lift station were among the financial issues discussed Monday at a Sarasota City Commission budget workshop.

…[Vice Mayor Suzanne] Atwell was much less pleased with the budget proposed for Bobby Jones, which she slammed for continuing to run deficits. In a prepared statement Atwell noted that the golf course has relied on taxpayers to cover deficits totaling $1.3 million over the last six years.

City taxpayers should not subsidize the golfing costs” for Bobby Jones patrons, Atwell wrote.

If a viable plan for balancing Bobby Jones budget does not materialize by Jan. 1, Atwell said the city “should consider leasing the facilities to a private operator."

Other commissioners expressed concerns about Bobby Jones but there was no formal action taken Monday.

SPECIAL CITY COMMISSION MEETING

MONDAY, JULY 13, 2015

CITY OF SARASOTA

Vice Mayor Suzanne Atwell's prepared comments:

“Over the past six years, the Bobby Jones Golf course has run deficits totaling $1.3 Million dollars, $400,000 last year alone, as a result of declining numbers of rounds with resulting revenue losses coupled with expenditure increases. We’re in a course this year for another deficit, optimistically projected at about $100,000.

“During these years, the staff has projected unrealistically high revenue estimates, same for golf rounds and cart rentals, which are not realized, and hence the deficits. This is the real ball game here.

“We have a situation here right now in which the Friends of Bobby Jones [Golf Club] has lost confidence in the staff’s financial management, and where the Friends do not appear to be working well with the advisory committee appointed by us.

“What I fear is that we now are getting a dysfunctional situation in which Bobby Jones may be spiraling out of control, with as yet no plan for dealing with the vast capital needs. Year after year, the City Commission has kicked the can down the road (I take a lot of responsibility for that) while not insisting until the appointment of the advisory committee with the need for long-range planning, including how to pay for it.

“I give staff credit for keeping this going. And, and I understand it. I was part of it for all these years. But it’s not sustainable anymore.

“I think a good starting principle which should guide the planning and implementation is that city taxpayers should not subsidize the golfing costs of a clientele, most of whom are not City residents, and where many local golf courses are available to non-members, albeit at prices somewhat higher than those at Bobby Jones.

“So what to do? This is just my thinking, my forecast.

“[No. 1:] Ask the advisory committee for an interim report within a month. I don’t want to wait ‘til December…if it’s possible. It’s just my view. And that report should include but not [be] limited to how to pay for capital requirements.

“[No. 2:] The advisory committee should be asked to work with the Friends of Bobby Jones [Golf Club] on these reports.

“[No. 3:] Reduce the staff estimates of revenue for $2.85 Mil to $2.6 Million which is still, still higher than just under $2 Million last year and probably optimistic staff estimate for this year for $2.6. Perhaps Mr. Lege could refine these estimates. My quarrel at this point is not with expenditures but with revenue.

“The result of the above would be a deficit of about $150,000 assuming staff recommendations for expenditures.

“No. 4: The Friends of Bobby Jones [Golf Club] perhaps should be asked to cover the deficit, whatever it turns out to be, in the interests of a Public Private Partnership.

“No. 5: If there’s no viable plan that we can see by January 1, 2016, the City Manager and all of us should consider perhaps leasing the facility to a private operator under conditions that would allow for profitability.

“These are my concerns.”

City Commissioners' additional comments:

“One final recommendation is that we look into what it would cost from a staff funding perspective to help assist with the funding of a master plan for the Bobby Jones Golf course. We’ve been talking about it for years, and that’s been a recommendation that’s come from both the advisory side and the Friends side, and looking at how much that might cost even as a portion of an investment going forward. That’s going to be the first step in us getting Bobby Jones back to its glory days.”

- City Commissioner Shellie Freeland Eddie

“I really would like to look at how we can perhaps sit at the table with the County on their Master Plan for Parks. They’ve hired a consultant to come in and do a master plan for Parks and Rec. Can we, and I’m just throwing this out there, I know we talk about what want to do with Parks and Rec and whether we go with a parks district and whatever, but can we sit at the table and would that reflect the money that we’re going to put into a consultant, can we do it that way, I’d just like to know if that’s an option to have place there, and make this a regional consolidation of Parks.”

- City of Sarasota Vice Mayor Suzanne Atwell

“I would like to see a status report from the Bobby Jones Committee. I would like to know where they’re standing on it. On the other issues I’d want to defer judgment about Bobby Jones but I would like to know if they are making progress, what direction they’re heading for, to. I would just like to know where they stand, because we haven’t heard from them since the previous Chair left.”

- City Commissioner Susan Chapman

Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club approached the City of Sarasota with an offer to sponsor children's golf camps at Bobby Jones Golf Club, and sponsored the first-ever Drive, Chip & Putt Boot Camp for Boys and Girls Ages 7 to 15.

Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club approached the City of Sarasota with an offer to sponsor children's golf camps at Bobby Jones Golf Club, and sponsored the first-ever Drive, Chip & Putt Boot Camp for Boys and Girls Ages 7 to 15.

SANTARELLI WINS SARASOTA MEN'S CITY GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP

SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2015

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY JIM BROCKMAN 

SARASOTA — Antione Santarelli blazed through the final round of the Sarasota Men’s City Golf Championship with a 3-under-par 69 on Sunday to claim the crown at the tournament held annually at the Bobby Jones Golf Club.

Santarelli, 21, finished the tournament, which began with the first two rounds of play last weekend, with an 8-under total of 280.

Santarelli, who currently trains at the Missing Link Golf Academy at Lakewood Ranch, finished seven strokes ahead of 55-year-old longtime Sarasota resident K.C. Fox.

Tononari Fukyama, 21, who is in his second year of training at IMG Academy in Bradenton, took third place after a disappointing round of 74 on Sunday. The former resident of Okinawa, Japan, was eight strokes back with an even-par 288 for 72 holes.

It is always great to win,” Santarelli said. “I took it as a personal challenge.

I knew I was playing good, so I had a feeling it was going to be a great day. I just went out and tried to play as well as I could.”

Santarelli seized the lead with a tournament-best 67 in the second round and never relinquished the top spot.

Fox trimmed Santarelli’s lead to two strokes following a Saturday-best 68 in the third round.

I thought his course management was really good,” Fox said after playing in the same foursome with Santarelli on Sunday. “He got in trouble on No. 7 and got a double bogey. But he came back to make some putts, some six- and eight-footers for par. That’s what you’ve got to do.

We had to chase him a lot. It’s a lot harder to chase than stay in the lead.”

Santarelli believes he played even better during the first weekend of the event played on the British Course at the 45-hole municipal facility that first opened in 1927.

Last weekend I putted really well,” he said. “I didn’t putt as well this weekend, but I was still hitting it good. My putter wasn’t as kind this weekend.”

Santarelli, originally from Corsica, plans to play in a U.S. Open prequalifier at TPC at Prestancia in Sarasota later this month.

It was the second runner-up finish at the Sarasota City Championship for Fox in the 15 years he has played in the tournament.

The golf course was set up much more difficult today,” Fox said. “It was playing long. They used every inch of this golf course. I have never seen it like this.”

Sarasota resident Brandon Johnson shot a final-round 73 to finish fourth with a one-over total of 289.

There was a three-way tie for fifth place between Mike Calomeris, Michael Butler and Ray Wenck at 292.

Two-time defending champion Phil Walters, who also won the crown in 2008, finished with a 76 to wind up with a 7-over par 295.

David Perna won the first flight championship with a total of 296. Matt Berube (299) won the second flight and the third flight title was a tie between Jeff Haire and Ken Kigongo at 320.

Richard Baran won the fourth flight at 319 and Al Anderson won the fifth flight at 337.

SARASOTA'S FIRST MAYOR LIVED AND BREATHED GOLF

SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2015

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY JEFF LAHURD

When John Hamilton Gillespie was 8 years old, his grandfather gave him a set of McEvan and Philip golf clubs. This was about 1860, those long ago days when golf was a man's game and clubs, or sticks, were handcrafted and bore names like niblick, lofter, mashie, midiron and cique.

(Gillespie recalled that a magazine article in 1867 addressed the issue of women on the golf course: “As for his wife, she must amuse herself as best she can; she cannot even accompany him in his game as a spectator, the presence of ladies being by no means regarded with favor...”)

From the day of his grandfather's gift forward, the Scot who is considered the Father of Sarasota never put the clubs down. In fact, he made a name for himself throughout Florida as the “Golfing Mayor,” an ambassador for the sport when few people in this country had even heard of it.

When his father, Sir John Gillespie, bid him to go to Florida and rekindle the failed Scot Colony in Sarasota for the Florida Mortgage and Investment Co., his clubs were in tow. To keep his game sharp and his passion for it alive, he roughed out a two-hole practice area near the site of today's post office building on Ringling Boulevard. That was in 1886, a year or so after the town of “Sara Sota” had been platted.

The Sarasota Times called him “perhaps the most ardent of golfers... (who) spends many hours every day in the winter season practicing difficult hazards and making famous shots.” The paper also noted that “his judgment is the criterion to which all disputes are taken for settlement.”

Colonist Alex Browning recounted coming upon Gillespie practicing his game. Gillespie asked the young man if he had ever played. When Browning replied that he had not, Gillespie said to him, “Mon, y're missin' half ye life.”

Gillespie was a large, good-spirited man with a ready smile who made the success of Sarasota his life's work.

To that end, he began a building campaign that saw the completion of the dock at the end of Main Street, the construction of the DeSoto Hotel at Main Street and Palm Avenue and two rusticated block buildings, one at Five Points the other on Gulf Stream Avenue. He also was involved in beautifying the downtown area and laying tracks for a minor railway line from Braidentown, derided as the Slow and Wobbly during its short lifetime. Later he would help establish the Church of the Redeemer.

In 1902, when a legitimate train line announced its intention to come to Sarasota, the citizens of the small community held a meeting at the pier and voted to incorporate as a town. Gillespie was the obvious choice to become its first mayor.

The importance of golf to the success of a community seeking newcomers was obvious to Gillespie. He noted, “It was not until Bellaire became famous as a golf course that Tampa wakened up to its responsibilities and now what a change we do find.”

Gillespie traveled throughout Florida developing golf courses and forever extolling the benefits of golf to the communities that supported it.

According to Historian Karl Grismer, in 1905 Gillespie laid out the first 9-hole course in Sarasota.

Gillespie's manservant and friend, Leonard Reid, recalled in a Herald-Tribune article how he was invited by Gillespie to walk with him through the palmettos and brush. They walked for miles as Gillespie sketched what would become Sarasota's first golf course.

Reid remembered that 50 men grubbed the palmettos and set up the fairways, which were only 30 to 40 feet wide. He stated, “That's why the colonel was so good. He'd always win his match because he could shoot straight. Colonel Gillespie only took a half a swing and the other men always could outhit him. But they would end up in the woods while the Colonel got in the hole.”

The first hole of his course went east from Links Avenue toward today's Sarasota County Terrace Building.

The second was further east, the third near today's Ringling Shopping Center and the fourth near Tuttle Avenue. The course then took a dog leg to the fifth, and the rest of the holes all headed back west, with the ninth hole directly in front of Gillespie's house, Golf Hall.

Writing under the name “The Colonel,” Gillespie was a regular contributor to “New York Golf” and “The Golfers Magazine.”

The local realization that Gillespie's pitch that golf could be a tourist magnet was amply demonstrated after Gillespie's clubhouse burned down in in 1915 and the course fell into disrepair. A town meeting to decide how to remedy the situation revealed how much golf had been embraced by the community.

The Sarasota Times wrote: “A golf-less tourist resort in Florida is in much the same class as a production of Hamlet with the star character left out.” Siesta Key developer Harry Higel chimed in, “The tourists will not come to Sarasota because every town in Florida is getting golf links.” Property owner Joseph M. Downey from Chicago added that it would be no use building a good tourist hotel without a golf course.

On the morning of Sept. 7, 1923, Gillespie left Golf Hall to give instructions to his workers, and as he was returning he collapsed on the links. He was carried home, where he passed away.

The Sarasota Times eulogized him: “The Colonel was a great man. His passing leaves us lonely, mournful, and filled with grief.”

In the grip of their loss, the townspeople promised that a bronze statue of the Golfing Mayor would be cast, and both a life mask and a full-length body mold were made. But the passage of time seemed to have diminished the sentiment and the project was forgotten. When the new Municipal Golf Course was dedicated in 1927, it was not to Gillespie but to golf's great amateur, Bobby Jones.

BOBBY JONES COMMITTEE PITCHES VISION FOR FUTURE

IN AMBITIOUSLY EXAMINING THE COURSE'S PROBLEMS, THE BOBBY JONES GOLF CLUB STUDY COMMITTEE HOPES TO DISCOVER A REALISTIC SOLUTION

The municipal facility has become an issue for the city as revenues decline and cost of managing aging infrastructure grow. The study committee will research potential solutions to that problem. Photo Courtesy YourObserver.com

The municipal facility has become an issue for the city as revenues decline and cost of managing aging infrastructure grow. The study committee will research potential solutions to that problem. Photo Courtesy YourObserver.com

APRIL 23, 2015

THE OBSERVER

BY DAVID CONWAY, NEWS EDITOR

SARASOTA – After a whirlwind — and occasionally tumultuous — first two months, the city’s Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee is finally getting its bearings and preparing to take a big swing at the challenge it’s facing.

The city established the committee late last year to help create a long-term plan for the golf course, which is facing structural issues and ran up an operating deficit of more than $100,000 each of the past two years. The goal, commissioners said, was to review various options for improving the facility and to gauge the financial viability of those options. At some point after that, they said, a full master plan might be developed.

When the City Commission appointed seven members to the board in February, commissioners praised candidates for having reasonable and realistic outlooks on the future of the course — driving home that cost would be a driving factor in any eventual improvements.

To familiarize itself with the subject matter, the group held seven meetings in its first five weeks, all of which were more than two hours long. The most intensive was a site visit held in February, a crash course on the operations and infrastructure at Bobby Jones.

Over those first five weeks, they became acutely aware of many of the problems facing the course — most of which have been raised in past studies, but which have been difficult to address financially.

Excellent drainage and efficient, reliable irrigation are really necessary,” committee member Norm Dumaine said. “Bobby Jones is crying out for that. The very structure of the course — the way the banks are built up the canal — really forms a kind dish that drops water into Bobby Jones.”

At the March 16 City Commission meeting, the committee provided an update on its early work to the commission. To do its job right, compiling the report would take 3,000 to 4,000 hours, the group said. That meant not only maintaining a busy schedule, but also working until the end of the year to compile a report rather than the initial summer deadline. 

At that meeting, the commission gave its blessing to the committee to extend the timeline. 

However, at an April 7 committee meeting, city administration informed the board that it could not commit the staff hours needed to that work schedule. Although most board members were fine with scaling back, Chairman John Bondur was not — and so he tendered his resignation immediately.

I understand the approach,” Bondur said at his final meeting. “I don’t agree with it, and I think it’s unfortunate that there’s an unwillingness from whomever the parties may be.”

Still, the board is charging forward. Now that it’s identified obstacles to address, the group is focused on gathering more public input and developing a work plan for completing its directive. At a meeting earlier this month, members of the committee took one last preliminary look at the big picture, sharing their personal visions for the future of the facility.

VISION BOARD

On April 2, the Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee gave its members a chance to offer their outlook on improving the course.

Norm Dumaine

There are so many golf courses in this area, even within five miles of Bobby Jones, that if Bobby Jones can’t somehow create some kind of niche in this market, some kind of thing that makes it really special, I’m not sure in the long run that we would be doing Bobby Jones a great favor if we just simply focus on budget. I think, at some point, you may have to spend a little bit of money to make more money. … It seems to me, over a long period of time, you might accomplish what you can’t do at this very moment.

Millie Small

My vision for Bobby Jones Golf Club starts with a question: How can we effectively create a plan for the future if we don’t face the reality of the present? It starts with the reality of the current condition of all three courses. … It is apparent that the courses and buildings have not been maintained for several years as they should have been, but budget cuts and other policies enacted by past commissions have created the present situation of replacements rather than repairs and regular maintenance. I have never envisioned dramatic changes to either of the 18-hole courses — just do what is needed.

Dan Smith

If we don’t deal with the really big issues, making a few changes to greens and tees is going to get us back to square one in two, three, four years. It’s an unfortunate situation. We all were there, took the tour and saw the condition of the property and the dysfunctional nature of the irrigation system and the drainage and the bathrooms and all the problems there. … To think there’s $8 (million) to $10 million to do a whole bunch of work — we all know that’s not there. But to be fiscally responsible, we have to acknowledge maybe minor isn’t the answer, either.

adam schenk takes bobby jones open

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2015

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY Tom Balog

Bobby Jones Open 2015 Champion Adam Schenk flanked by club Assistant Pro Dan Bailey and Head PGA Pro Christian Martin. Photo courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Bobby Jones Open 2015 Champion Adam Schenk flanked by club Assistant Pro Dan Bailey and Head PGA Pro Christian Martin. Photo courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

SARASOTA - Adam Schenk seized upon a break that kept the 23-year-old Purdue University graduate alive on the first hole of the Bobby Jones Open three-way playoff to win his second West Florida Golf Tour title Sunday. 

Schenk birdied the par-4 No.10 hole with an eight-foot putt to defeat Don Leafstrand and Spence Fulford and take home the $4,000 first place money of the $25,000 tournament at Bobby Jones Golf Club. It wouldn’t have been possible had Schenk’s drive not hit a rock on the fringe of a pond, out of bounds, and caromed back onto the fairway, 33 yards from the pin. “Lucky,” said Schenk, who is from Vincennes, Ind. “I swung a little too hard and I pulled it and it was heading for the water and I figured it was in. But it apparently hit the rocks and kicked out. I got it up-and-down to win. “I was lucky enough to roll it over the front edge - last roll,” Schenk said.

He hit it in the middle of a lake and ended up winning the golf tournament,” said Christian Martin, the tournament director and head golf pro at Bobby Jones. “It hit the rocks and came back. He got the break of his life.” “If I wasn’t there, I wouldn’t have believed it,” said Christian Bartolacci, the president and director of the West Florida Tour.

Schenk, Leafstrand and Fulford each finished the 36 holes of regulation tied at 11-under par 133. “I’ve actually been on the unlucky side of things,” Schenk said. “The biggest one was the round of 32 at the U.S. Amateur at Cherry Hills. I was in a playoff, 21st hole. I was 10 feet for birdie and the guy was I don’t know, 50 yards for birdie, and he made it against me. So it’s nice to have it come back my way once.” The first-round leader, Samuel Chavez, who shot 8-under par 64 Saturday, fizzled with a 2-over 74 Sunday. Michael Visacki (68-68) of Sarasota and Adam Hogue (67-69) of Lakewood Ranch ended tied for fourth at 8-under 136.

Just couldn’t make any putts coming down the stretch,” said Visacki, who watched a few roll in and out. “I had a couple ‘burnouts,’ ‘lipouts,’ almost like 360s. You make those, I’m right there.” Thirty-five of the tournament’s 115 entrants (93 pros and 22 amateurs) broke par.

This event completes the second year of a five-year contract that the West Florida Golf Tour has with the City of Sarasota to stage an event at Bobby Jones. Bartolacci expects the Bobby Jones Open to continue indefinitely. 

Adam Schenk watches his $4,000 putt roll toward the cup. Tom Balog Photo Courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Adam Schenk watches his $4,000 putt roll toward the cup. Tom Balog Photo Courtesy Sarasota Herald-Tribune

CITY OF SARASOTA COMMISSION RECAP

FEBRUARY 2, 2015

ACCESS SARASOTA

MILES LARSEN, CITY OF SARASOTA

A look back at the Regular City Commission Meeting of February 2, 2015. The Commission went to Board appointments, and there was one to take care of: The Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee. The Commission appointed the following members to that Committee: John BondurJay LoganMillie SmallClarence Rogers, [Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club Charter Friend] Rich Kyllonen, [Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club Trustee and Treasurer] Dan Smith and Norman Dumaine.

COMMISSIONer's CORNER

DECEMBER 18, 2014

PAUL CARAGIULO, CITY OF SARASOTA

City Commissioner Paul Caragiulo sits down with Shawn Pierson, the President of Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club to discuss the past, present and future of our very own municipal golf course.

Sarasota City Commissioners Identify Top Legislative Priorities

November 4, 2014

BRADENTON HERALD

BY CLAIRE ARONSON 

SARASOTA - On Monday, the city commissioners also approved the formation of an ad hoc committee to address improvements to the Bobby Jones Golf Course, 1000 Circus Blvd., Sarasota, to remedy deterioration. The Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee would be made up of at least five citizen volunteers. Appointments to the committee will be made at the commissioner's first meeting in January and applications to be on the committee be accepted later this month

At the meeting, Commissioner Suzanne Atwell asked that the committee's members be residents of the City of Sarasota and if there are not qualified people within the city, then could look outside the city into Sarasota and Manatee counties. The other commissioners approved the clarification.

"I think everyone is in agreement that the city is to retain control of the operation," Commissioner Paul Caragiulo said.

Sarasota resident Millie Small told the commissioners on Monday, "Let's keep it simple and do what needs to be done."

Sarasota resident Norman Dumaine said an ad hoc committee should be formed.

"I want it to become the best municipal golf course that it can be," Dumaine said. "We are all invested in the success of Bobby Jones (Golf Course)."

Sarasota may form committee for Bobby Jones golf course

Don Perron, right, of Sarasota, practices for a tournament in September at Bobby Jones Golf Club in Sarasota. A local not-for-profit group, Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, is making a plea to the city for improvements at the only municipal golf course in Sarasota. Photograph by Mike Lang courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Saturday, November 1, 2014

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

By Ian Cummings

SARASOTA – A committee for improvements at the Bobby Jones Golf Club may be appointed next month, if the City Commission creates it on Monday.

The Bobby Jones Golf Club Study Committee would be asked to look into, among other things, reports of deteriorating conditions at the public golf course. Advocates have long pushed for more investment in the golf club, and a consultant’s report recently caused a stir at City Hall by calling the the practice facilities “substandard.”

The City Commission responded by drawing up plans for a golf course committee, but shied away from giving the group power to create a master plan. The group would have wide latitude to make recommendations on capital improvements, fees, and management, but city commissioners made clear in October that they wanted advice on fixing bridges and irrigation systems.

City Commissioner Paul Caragiulo, once a competitive golfer, played at Bobby Jones in his youth and still does occasionally. It is obvious to him, he said, that the course is in decline

“It’s not what it was,” Caragiulo said.

Everyone agrees Bobby Jones needs work, but exactly what should be done, and at what cost, is less clear. “I hear all kinds of different things. Different people want different things,” he said.

The city has considered improvements at Bobby Jones before. It hired National Golf Foundation Consulting in 2008, and again in 2014, to study the golf club, built in 1926 off the northeast corner of Fruitville and Beneva roads in Sarasota. Meanwhile, the club has continued to do a higher volume of business than other courses in the area, averaging 135,286 rounds of golf per year. Fees to play an 18-hole round there range from $18 to $49, depending on the season.

Some advocates for the golf course pushed for a master plan to overhaul the golf club. But Vice Mayor Susan Chapman and Mayor Willie Shaw, concerned about talk of “best use” real estate studies and potential threats to the public nature of the golf club, insisted that the committee be narrowly mandated.

The Bobby Jones Study Committee would be composed of five members appointed by the City Commission. They would have to be residents of Sarasota or Manatee counties, though commissioners said they would give preference to city residents.

Shawn Pierson, the president of the Friends of Bobby Jones Golf, urged city commissioners to include people with golf course expertise.

Prospective members could begin submitting applications on Nov. 10, and the committee would be appointed on Nov. 17. The committee would hold public meetings and then present its recommendations to the City Commission in April.

Better Ball Open Signals Revival

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2014

sarasota herald-tribune

by tom Balog

SARASOTA – Erica Fitzpatrick-Kathy Westlund shot an even-par 72 to take the first-round lead in the low gross category of the Women's Better Ball Open at Bobby Jones Golf Club.

Joyce Gunby-Cynthia Cordova are the low net leaders in the first flight going into Sunday's final round.

Abby Vanderwood-Vicki Dehaai are the low gross leaders in the second flight and they are also tied for low net with Colleen C. Keeler-Ida Remmers.

The tournament, staged by the Bobby Jones Women's Golf Association, replaced the City of Sarasota Women's Championship, which was cancelled after last year due to only 12 players participating.

Keith Miller, the president of the Bobby Jones Women's Golf Association which staged the event, and Christian Martin, the head golf pro at Bobby Jones, the host site, were both happy with the field of 36 golfers.

"It's a small turnout, but considering where we were a year ago, it's very successful," Miller said. "I know that Sue (Martin, Bobby Jones general manager) and Christian and Daniel (Bailey, assistant pro at Bobby Jones) worked really hard with us to get the word out and get everything done."

"Our goal was 40 and we accomplished it," Christian Martin said. "One lady had a detached retina and had to drop out. Somebody had a medical emergency. We had an odd number of teams so we had to cut back. I think we'll easily hit 60 players next year."

Miller said that the event tripled the entry list of the 2013 City Women's Championship despite a conflict with a Greater Sarasota Women's Golf Association event that was also played Saturday, and an Area Council Women's Golf event scheduled for Monday at Plantation Golf & Country Club, that had been rescheduled from last Monday.

"We're all competing for the same players," Miller said. "I think we need to coordinate our tournaments better so we can all support women's golf. I think it's sad when women don't support other women's golf events. We put out a 'save the date' in May for this weekend."

Martin said women like team tournaments better.

"I talked to several ladies throughout the area and it seems to me they all would prefer a team event over an individual event," Martin said. "Because they don't have to carry the burden that way. You got a partner that can pick you up when you're down. To have an individual championship you need a lot of ladies that are single-digit handicappers. Although there are some very good ladies in the area, it's hard to get them all together at the same time with everybody's busy schedule. So a team event works much, much better for the ladies." 

Half of the proceeds from the tournament will benefit the Florida Suncoast affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure.

"The good thing is the money stays here in the area, which we think is important," Miller said. "We have a lot of (breast cancer) survivors in our association. Right now we have a member that is up north battling breast cancer. So tomorrow we're going to all try to wear pink, so we can send her a picture."

Commissioners hash out details of Bobby Jones committee

October 7, 2014

Sarasota Observer

By David Conway

News Editor

Although the future look of Bobby Jones Golf Club is still in question, the Sarasota City Commission affirmed its interest in maintaining the course as an affordable municipal attraction for residents at a meeting Monday.

The commission worked on defining the scope and parameters of an ad-hoc advisory committee that will help guide the future of Bobby Jones. Commissioners unanimously voted to create the ad-hoc committee following a September workshop and commission meeting, but there was some tension between the resolution presented by City Attorney Robert Fournier and the vision that some commissioners had.

Rather than simply tasking that group with developing a request for proposals for upgrades at Bobby Jones, commissioners expressed a desire to make the ad-hoc committee a forum by which the community at large could express its vision for the future of the golf club. Vice Mayor Susan Chapman said she was worried the committee could be overpowered by voices interested in a particular vision for the golf club — such as the Friends of Bobby Jones [Golf Club] who advocate restoring the club's historic Donald Ross course.

“We need to make sure that, whatever we do, there are public meetings and an opportunity to bring clear public input without skewing the outcome,” Chapman said.

In addition to the scope of the work, commissioners discussed the selection process for members of the Bobby Jones committee. The commission ultimately indicated an interest in fielding applications and favoring city residents in the selection process, although expertise in the field was a leading priority for some commissioners.

The ad-hoc committee will be tasked with outlining the possible options for maintaining or upgrading the facility to the commission, making recommendations for the future growth and management of the golf club. The commission will continue its discussion regarding the makeup and purview of the committee at its next meeting.

The starter's shack for the American and British courses at Bobby Jones Golf Club in Sarasota. A local not-for-profit group, Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, is making a plea to the city for improvements at the only municipal golf course in Sarasota.

Photography by Mike Lang   Courtesy of Sarasota Herald-Trribune

City wants tighter focus on golf course review

October 7, 2014

Sarasota Herald-Tribune

By IAN CUMMINGS

iancummings@heraldtribune.com

SARASOTA – A committee for improvements at the Bobby Jones Golf Club may be created with a sharply limited mandate, according to the wishes of city commissioners on Monday.

The City Commission, after determining last month to act on reports of deteriorating facilities at the public golf course, shied away from a resolution calling for a Bobby Jones Golf Club Master Plan Committee. The committee would have been tasked with a broad review of the golf club's operations, and could have been charged with making a contract for a sweeping master plan.

Instead, the commissioners discussed creating an ad hoc board of citizens and golf experts to consider golf course improvements such as irrigation fixes and bridge repairs. A consultant recently caused a stir at City Hall by reporting that the club's practice facility was substandard, the practice range was too short, and that the golf club needed a long-term strategy.

But on Monday, Vice Mayor Susan Chapman and other commissioners said tentative outlines for a Master Plan Committee, drawn up by city staff, went too far. A draft resolution called for the committee to review “best use” real estate studies, changes to club management, and a market analysis.

“These are things that start to have a wiggle room that is sort of scary,” Chapman said. She said such a broad mandate could threaten the public nature of the golf club, and the city's priority should be maintaining reasonable fees, accessibility for the public, and preserving green space.

Mayor Willie Shaw even worried about somehow losing the golf course. “I'd hate, one day, to see some great hotel have it's own private golf course here at the expense of taxpayers,” Shaw said.

The city has considered improvements at Bobby Jones before. The city hired National Golf Foundation Consulting in 2008, and again in 2014, to study the golf club, built in 1926 off the northeast corner of Fruitville and Beneva roads in Sarasota. Meanwhile, the club has continued to do a higher volume of business than other courses in the area, averaging 135,286 rounds of golf per year. Fees to play an 18-hole round there range from $18 to $49, depending on the season.

On Monday, commissioners had difficulty articulating what they wanted to see happen at Bobby Jones. Shawn Pierson, the president of the Friends of Bobby Jones Golf [Club], urged city commissioners to include people with golf course expertise in whatever committee they create.

City commissioners asked city staff to return at a later meeting with plans for an ad hoc group that could begin recommending some improvements to the golf course and answer basic questions. “How much is this going to cost us?” asked Commissioner Shannon Snyder. “It should not be that difficult. Other communities have done this.”

If the City Commission votes to create the ad hoc group, members of the public may apply to serve on it. City commissioners said they will likely give priority to city residents.

GOLF CLUB IS TEED UP FOR CITY

October 6, 2014

Sarasota Herald-Tribune

BOBBY JONES: City Attorney has prepared options for the board’s consideration

By IAN CUMMINGS

iancummings@heraldtribune.com

SARASOTA – A committee responsible for the future of the Bobby Jones Golf Club may begin to take shape today with a vote by the City Commission.

The ad hoc group, the Bobby Jones Golf Club Master Plan Committee, will be tasked with charting a course for the maintenance and development of the golf course, including improvements some club members have been seeking for years.

Commissioners decided to form the committee last month, after hearing a report from the National Golf Foundation that said the practice facility at Bobby Jones was substandard, the practice range is too short, and that the club needed a long-term strategy. Local golfer Paul Azinger, a former pro and 1987 PGA Player of the Year, told commissioners that he’s heard the course dismissed as a “goat ranch,” because of its disrepair.

The commissioners will likely discuss how to select people for the master plan committee. City Attorney Bob Fournier said the resolution he will give to the commissioners will not be final but will include alternatives that must be narrowed down.

“This is an opportunity for the commissioners to be more specific about what they want,” Fournier said. “Sometime’s it’s easier to have a discussion if you have options in front of you.”

The commissioners could require members of the committee to be city residents, or accept residents of Sarasota and Manatee counties. The commissioners may also set a deadline for a plan.

The committee will be asked to review the club’s finances and market position, and consider the golf course’s design and possible changes to the club’s management and fee structure.

The committee will first be asked to create a request for proposals to solicit contracts for a master plan, but also might later be charged with selecting a contract for a master plan.

The committee will be required to operate according to the Sunshine Law, Fournier said, and members of the committee would be disqualified from bidding on contracts.

The meeting will not be the first time the city has considered improvements at Bobby Jones. For years, the city-owned golf course, built in 1926 off the northeast corner of Fruitville and Beneva roads, has been the subject of studies and criticism. Nevertheless, the club has continued to do a high volume of business, averaging 135,286 rounds of golf per yea for the last 19 years.

That is more, club staff said, than any other course in the area. Fees to play an 18-hole round at Bobby Jones are relatively economical, ranging from a high of $49 in the winter months to $18 in the summer.

In recent years, annual figures have declined from a high of 143,066 rounds in 2007 to 102,283 rounds in 2013. Financially, the course broke even in 2013, according to city staff.

Teeing off at Bobby Jones

Private sector could help restore public course

Friday, September 19, 2014

Sarasota Herald-Tribune

After years of criticism, complaints and consultations, the Sarasota City Commission took an important step toward renovating historic Bobby Jones Golf Club.

At the urging of Paul Azinger, a Sarasota native and 12-time winner on the PGA tour, the commission on Monday unanimously agreed to appoint a committee to create a long-term plan for the city-owned course.

The main objective for the committee will be to determine what the golf club needs to, as Azinger put it, “bring it up to standards.” What those needs will cost and how to pay for them will the next questions.

The club's flaws - from a dilapidated clubhouse to a course worn by time and the traffic of more than 100,000 players a year - have been cited for years by players and consultants. Needed improvements have been placed on hold to see what the City Commission would do.

Monday's action starts the ball rolling.

The commission's decision follows a recommendation in January by National Golf Foundation consultants for a “comprehensive master plan” to “help establish how municipal golf fits into the City's overall recreation.” The plan, they said, should include proposed improvements to Bobby Jones' facilities, operations and marketing.

The big picture

“We have to figure out what the whole big picture is, what we need to do, what should we do and how can we do it?” said Commissioner Paul Caragiulo, the chief proponent of the master plan.

“The bigger question,” he added, “is whether the city should be in the golf business and in what capacity?”

The city has been in the golf business since 1925, when the original 18-hole course was designed by famed course architect Donald Ross. The club was named for legendary golfer Bobby Jones, who personally dedicated the facility in 1927. Nine more holes were added in 1952 and another nine in 1967. A nine-hole "executive course" was completed in 1977. 

Bobby Jones' courses have been played by such golf stars as Walter Hagen, Tommy Armour, Gene Sarazen and Babe Didrikson Zaharias as well as baseball legend Babe Ruth. Azinger played there as a boy, and in 1980 shot a 62 to set the club's British Course record (there's an American Course, too).

Besides its rich history, the Bobby Jones club has been a successful business. It's self-supporting despite a fee structure that is among the lowest in the region, and hasn't needed a subsidy from the city in decades.

Christian Martin, assistant manager and head golf professional, told the Herald-Tribune's Tom Balog that Bobby Jones is the busiest public or private course in the area.

But all that traffic takes a toll. Like any business, Bobby Jones Golf Club needs periodic renovations not only to revitalize course and other facilities but to adapt to today's golfing market.

While the costs have yet to be determined, restoring or replacing the clubhouse alone would run into the millions of dollars.

That's too much for the club to afford through fees and other revenues, even with reasonable increases.

The city - already struggling to fund basic services plus pension costs - might not be able to shoulder all of the added expense either, though some money for clubhouse renovation was raised through county's added "penny tax."

A friend in need

Consequently, the private sector - current players, former patrons of the club, and anyone who sees the value in a municipal course accessible at reasonable costs to young and old alike - will probably need to chip in.

A local group, the Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, that has pushed for the commission to take action, is a likely resource for private fundraising.

Azinger appears ready to help. "I'm 100 percent behind whatever it takes,” he told the City Commission. “I put my hat in the ring now, to see that this facility has a legacy that will last forever.”

That's the type of support - from the golfing community and the city - that will help keep Bobby Jones Golf Club part of Sarasota's history for years to come.

The 2008 U.S. Ryder Cup captain, Major champion and 12-time winner on the PGa Tour who grew up in Sarasota, Paul Azinger speaks with Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club President Shawn Pierson to the City Commission in support of the Four Initiatives.

Commission moves toward Bobby Jones master plan

September 16, 2014

Sarasota Observer

By David Conway

News Editor

The Sarasota City Commission, capitalizing on the presence of a local golf icon, committed itself to developing a new plan to guide the future of Bobby Jones Golf Club at a meeting Monday.

Still, the bold vision endorsed by several individuals in attendance was tempered with pragmatic concerns, most notably questions surrounding the cost of revitalizing the aging facility.

The commission unanimously directed staff to draft a resolution that would create an ad-hoc committee regarding a master plan for Bobby Jones. The precise details of the committee are still to be finalized, but commissioners indicated that the citizen board would help determine the scope of such a document, which would then be written by an outside agency.

The board took up the topic following a Sept. 3 workshop about the Bobby Jones Golf Club. A 2014 study by the National Golf Foundation said the city is in need of a comprehensive plan for managing the future of the course, and the Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club has created a four-part vision to improve the facility and grow the game locally.

One of those initiatives is named after Paul Azinger, a Sarasota High School graduate who played at Bobby Jones before going on to success as a professional golfer. Azinger appeared at Monday’s meeting, urging commissioners to capitalize on the chance to improve the facility.

Azinger said that, although the current state of the golf club is suboptimal, it has the potential to become a serious draw. He pointed to Pinehurst Resort in North Carolina, which like Bobby Jones features a course designed by Donald Ross, and which hosted this year’s U.S. Open tournament following a 2011 renovation.

Were the city willing to address some of the problems that plague the course — drainage issues, aging infrastructure — several speakers said Bobby Jones could become a significant attraction.

“Every golf course gets old, not unlike cars or houses,” Azinger said. “There comes a time when you just have to have a facelift.”

Although the commission moved toward the creation of a citizen committee to help guide the master planning process, some commissioners encouraged a more cautious approach when considering the possible improvements. Commissioners Shannon Snyder and Susan Chapman both emphasized that cost would be an issue for the city, with Chapman expressing concern that pro-golf interests could take the master plan in a direction the city could not afford.

“I'm really reluctant to go to the ad-hoc committee point of view, because we do have such strong passionate interest groups for whom it seems cost is no object,” Chapman said. “For us, cost is an object, and we're going to have a financing plan for whatever we do.”

Deputy City Manager Marlon Brown said the eventual master plan would offer a variety of options for commissioners to pick and chose from depending on budgetary constraints and the will of the board.

Shawn Pierson, president of Friends of Bobby Jones Golf Club, said he was encouraged by the commission’s action, and that he hoped that the eventual master planning process would allow for broad citizen input.

“What it does is it allows for the widest possible community input,” Pierson said about the potential ad-hoc committee. “They’ll all be able to come and offer their experience and vision.”

City hears plea to restore Bobby Jones Golf Course

Monday, September 15, 2014

Sarasota Herald-Tribune

By Tom Balog

After Paul Azinger told the Sarasota City Commission that a friend told him the deteriorating Bobby Jones Golf Club is becoming as a “goat ranch,” commissioners unanimously agreed to appoint an ad hoc committee to develop a long-term plan for the historic course.

Commissioner Paul Caragiulo, who made the motion Monday night for a resolution charging the committee with crafting a course plan, said he would like to see it in place by July 2015.

Azinger, who played the course as a teenager at Sarasota High School, went on to become a 12-time winner on the PGA Tour. The 1987 PGA Player of the Year said he welcomes the opportunity to have input into the process.

“My hope is that Bobby Jones will get the facelift that it needs,” said Azinger, who lives in Bradenton. “It's truly a 'diamond in the rough' for us. I'm 100 percent behind whatever it takes. I put my hat in the ring now, to see that this facility has a legacy that will last forever. There is so much potential for it to be a destination location. We can draw people from all over the world to play this facility — if it's up to standards.”

Azinger told the commissioners that some of America's most famous courses, such as Augusta National and Pinehurst, in North Carolina, routinely require facelifts.

“It just has to happen,” Azinger said. “It's time for this facility to raise its bar a little bit.”

He told the commission that hearing his friend, Rich Kyllonen, refer to it as a “goat ranch” is “such a shame.”

He said he would favor tearing down and rebuilding the clubhouse.

“If that's what they decide, then I'm behind it,” Azinger said. “I'm going to lobby for a re-do of the clubhouse and everything.”

There are skeptics that have seen, as Commissioner Suzanne Atwell noted, the topic of restoring Bobby Jones being kicked down the road all too often.

“I'm hesitantly optimistic,” said Kerry Kirschner, a former city commissioner who spoke to the commission about the need for updating the facility.

But money will be the issue. Commissioners Susan Chapman and Shannon Snyder acknowledged that the commission will wrestle with how much it can afford to spend on Bobby Jones.

Twice over the past six years, the city hired National Golf Foundation Consulting — in 2008 and again in 2014 — to conduct a thorough review of the Bobby Jones Golf Club, built in 1926 off the northeast corner of Fruitville and Beneva roads in Sarasota.

The review came back with a report of a dire need for upgrades after examining the operations, management, marketing and physical condition of the Bobby Jones Golf Complex, which includes 36 championship holes, 18 named the British course and 18 holes the American course, along with a smaller, nine-hole executive length (par 30) course.

The National Golf Foundation determined in 2008 that the aging clubhouse has “poor curb appeal” and “a number of design issues that contribute to operational inefficiencies as well as lost revenue opportunities.”

The parking lot also is not appealing, and the locker rooms are not well-utilized, the report said.

In 2014, NGF said the golf operation had improved considerably, but that the city needs to formulate a “comprehensive master plan” to “help establish how municipal golf fits into the City's overall recreation offering,” including “prioritizing capital needs . . . improving some of the operational technology and marketing at the facility.”

Befitting an aging structure, earlier this year the city spent $80,199 to repair plumbing in the clubhouse and rent temporary restrooms for a four-month period, starting from December, during the peak of the tourist season.

Funding has been approved to replace a bridge on the 15th hole of the American course.

But those were just “Band-Aids” that don't address the long-range future for the complex.

“The facility is in desperate need of some type of master long-term plan,” said Caragiulo. “We have to figure out what the whole big picture is, what we need to do, what should we do and how can we do it? The bigger question is whether the city should be in the golf business and in what capacity?”

The city budget for the coming fiscal year starts Oct. 1.

“This timing is perfect to make this assessment,” Caragiulo said.

The National Golf Foundation report also stated that the practice facility was substandard, the lowest quality in the area and the practice range is too short.

Nonetheless, Bobby Jones does a substantial amount of business, especially in the winter months.

Christian Martin, assistant manager and head golf professional at Bobby Jones for four and half years, said the course is the busiest public or private course in the area, mainly because of its economical fee structure, which ranges from a high of $49.00 for an 18-hole round in the winter months to $18 in the summer.

Bobby Jones has averaged 135,286 rounds of golf per year for the last 19 years.

“We do significantly more rounds than the Meadows, which has three 18-hole courses, and Lakewood Ranch Golf and Country Club, which also had three 18-hole courses, just to name a couple,” Martin said. “We try to be something for everybody. That's the role of a municipal golf course.”

But the annual figures have declined from a high of 143,066 rounds in 2007 to 102,283 rounds in 2013.

With two weeks left in the 2014 fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30, Bobby Jones has totaled 101,095 rounds of golf.

Martin said that in the high season months of January, February and March, the course operated at capacity during the week, with 550 rounds played per day.

In those three months, Bobby Jones took in $298,708, $450,326 and $436,773. In 2013, those three months totaled $330,000, $389,551 and $395,309. In 2012, the figures were $329,168, $435,872; and $278,062.

Operating revenue at Bobby Jones was $2,382,372 in 2013, $2,701,294 in 2012, $2,663,769 in 2011 and $2,628,088 in 2010, according to the city's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

However, the course broke even in 2013, according to Sue Martin, the general manager of Bobby Jones.

The city did make a cost-saving move by contracting with an outside maintenance company to care for the course, at $1.4 million per year.

BOBBY JONES GOLF CLUB: $25 MILLION CASH COW

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2014

SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE

BY TOM BALOG

SARASOTA